An inter­view with

Erberto Lo Bue

Pos­i­tion & Affil­i­ation: Asso­ci­ate Pro­fess­or at the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna (retired)
Date: Septem­ber 2019 in Torre Pel­lice, Italy

Inter­viewed by: Guido Vogliotti

Cite this archive

Oral His­tory of Tibetan Stud­ies. (2021, Decem­ber 2). An inter­view with Erberto Lo Bue. Retrieved 31 Janu­ary 2023, from https://oralhistory.iats.info/interviews/erberto-lo-bue/.
“An inter­view with Erberto Lo Bue.” Oral His­tory of Tibetan Stud­ies, 2 Dec. 2021, https://oralhistory.iats.info/interviews/erberto-lo-bue/.
Oral His­tory of Tibetan Stud­ies. 2021. An inter­view with Erberto Lo Bue. [online], Avail­able at: https://oralhistory.iats.info/interviews/erberto-lo-bue/ [Accessed 31 Janu­ary 2023]
Oral His­tory of Tibetan Stud­ies. “An inter­view with Erberto Lo Bue.” 2021, Decem­ber 2. https://oralhistory.iats.info/interviews/erberto-lo-bue/.

Regard­ing Ques­tion 2: “His­tory” as a sub­ject taught from the age of 8 onwards; reli­gion was not com­puls­ory, but civics was, like phys­ic­al training.

Addenda in rela­tion to Charles Rollier’s lib­rary: MacDonell’s Sanskrit-Eng­l­ish Dictionary

Errata in rela­tion to Charles Rol­li­er: I con­trib­uted to “the cata­logue of Rolllier’s exhib­i­tion”; Cor­rige: to “the mono­graph pub­lished on the occa­sion of Rollier’s exhibition

Errata: “Tibetans, who have become a minor­ity in their own country”
Cor­rige: “Tibetans, who have become a minor­ity in the People’s Repub­lic of China” (as poin­ted out by Tsul­trim Zangmo in “The New Trend of Han Migra­tion to TAR”,The Tibet Journ­al, XLIV/1, 2019, p. 64).

Origin, childhood, and family background

I was born on the 30th July 1946 at Torre Pel­lice, Tur­in province, in the Waldensi­an Val­leys of Pied­mont less than a year after the end of the civil war between the Fas­cist regime rep­res­en­ted by the Salò Repub­lic sup­por­ted by its Ger­man allies and rebels who res­isted their occupation.

 

Son of Iolan­da Bianco, from a middle-class fam­ily in Tur­in, and Francesco Singleton lo Bue (1914–1955, on whom see Fil­ippo Maria Giord­ano, Francesco Singleton Lo Bue, pastore valdese, anti­fas­cista e fed­er­alista, Torino 2013), Waldensi­an min­is­ter as well as high-school teach­er with a degree in clas­sic­al lit­er­at­ure at Rome Uni­ver­sity and one in theo­logy at the Waldensi­an Fac­ulty of Theo­logy in Rome, born in Tripoli (Libya) from an Eng­lish Baptist mis­sion­ary lady, and from a Sicili­an Social­ist and Free­ma­son Baptist min­is­ter. My fath­er joined the Waldensi­an Church and got his degree in theo­logy with a thes­is on Tyconi­us’ Frag­ments on the Apo­ca­lypse pub­lished in 1963 (The Tur­in frag­ments of Tyconi­us’ Com­ment­ary on Rev­el­a­tion, Cam­bridge Uni­ver­sity Press). I belonged to the middle class and was nev­er a Chris­ti­an, my fath­er hav­ing giv­en me the choice of being bap­tized or not, and the study of the Bible and cat­ech­ism at school had the oppos­ite effect to what he might have wished, espe­cially after I studed Greek philo­sophy at “liceo classico”.

 

Primary and secondary education

As a teen­ager I atten­ded middle and high schools, mostly in Tur­in, where I learned Itali­an, Lat­in, Greek and Eng­lish lan­guages and lit­er­at­ures, French, his­tory (the sub­ject I liked most), art his­tory, philo­sophy, maths, geo­metry, tri­go­no­metry, nat­ur­al sci­ences and chem­istry, besides phys­ic­al train­ing  as well as civic edu­ca­tion,  car­ry­ing out my first field work (1961–1962) among Itali­an immig­rants dwell­ing in the lodgings of the Tur­in Bor­ough  Assist­ance Board (ECA) under the guid­ance of my teach­er Gior­gina Levi, a Jew­ish lady who had been com­pelled to leave Italy and move to Bolivia fol­low­ing the issue of the Fas­cist  laws for the defence of the race, on whom see Mar­cella Fil­ippa (ed.), Avrei capo­volto le montagne. Gior­gina Levi in Bolivia, 1939–1946 (Firen­ze 1990). Apart from my con­tri­bu­tions, that research included draw­ings of mine and exem­pli­fies what would be years later the meth­od­o­logy of my field work, based on inter­views to artists and pho­to­graphs. That kind of exper­i­ence made me real­ize even­tu­ally that the gap between intel­lec­tu­al know­ledge and real­ity may be over­come only by con­tact with real people and objects, that is field work, which would mean adding a social and anthro­po­lo­gic­al dimen­sion to my studies.

It was from Gior­gina Levi that for the first time I heard the expres­sion “oral his­tory”, a sub­ject she was par­tic­u­larly inter­ested in besides polit­ics and cinema: on Sundays she took us to the Cinema Museum in Tur­in, where we would watch films that were sel­dom or no longer shown in cinemas, although that was not the place where I saw the film that fas­cin­ated me most: Lawrence of Ara­bia. She was accred­ited journ­al­ist at the Bien­nale del Cinema in Venice where we would meet when I lived there. Gior­gina Levi regarded me as a good stu­dent and even­tu­ally we became friends, vis­it­ing Itali­an art cit­ies and archae­olo­gic­al sites from 1968 onwards, and even­tu­ally Peru and Bolivia (1971), where she had asked me to accom­pany her to vis­it the places where she had lived and worked as a refugee dur­ing the Fas­cist regime, our stay there end­ing with a mil­it­ary coup d’état with curfew, and Israel, which we vis­ited in 1976–1977. In our cor­res­pond­ence, pre­served at Archi­vio Diar­ist­ico Nazionale at Borgo Santo Stefano, I occa­sion­ally use Yid­dish terms which had become part of our lan­guage. It is con­ceiv­able that an interest in minor­it­ies (Jews and later Newars, Sher­pas, Lada­kis, Tibetans besides Waldensi­ans, though I am not a Chris­ti­an), which I came to regard all as “salt of the earth” developed also because of our relationship.

In 1962 I became a mem­ber of “Nuova Res­istenza”, an anti-Fas­­cist organ­iz­a­tion, in Tur­in. Before that I had star­ted trav­el­ling and hav­ing work exper­i­ences abroad, my most not­able exper­i­ence being a jour­ney from Castle Don­ing­ton (1964), where I had taken part in a camp organ­ized by the United Nations Asso­ci­ation to dec­or­ate rooms where chil­dren of Ger­man refugees lived and where I met volun­teers from vari­ous coun­tries, includ­ing North Africa. Instead of going back to Italy I decided to head north­wards, hitchik­ing and sleep­ing in youth hos­tels as far as Scot­land includ­ing the Orkney and Shet­land Islands, where I was inter­viewed by a friendly journ­al­ist, no Itali­an hav­ing been seen there for a score of years. I asked a Nor­we­gi­an fish­ing-boat at Ler­wick for a lift and was taken to a vil­lage on the island of Våg­søy, the most import­ant fish­ing har­bour of Nor­way, from which I con­tin­ued my trip in Nor­way, then head­ing to Sweden, Den­mark and Ger­many, where I found a job in Ham­burg for enough time to allow me earn enough money to pay for a train tick­et to Italy, after return­ing most of the money I had received from my mater­nal grand­moth­er for my good per­form­ance at high school, to prove to myself that I could man­age on my own. After that exper­i­ence I star­ted play­ing the gui­tar and singing polit­ic­al songs in a group called “Can­tim­ban­chi”, per­form­ing at fest­ivals and in theatres in Tur­in and oth­er places in Pied­mont, as well as in Siena.

In 1965 I left my Tur­in home for good, nev­er to return to live with my moth­er, with whom I had exper­i­enced prob­lems since my child­hood, and moved to a loft join­ing my lady friend, who was six years than I was, start­ing a long leg­al battle with with the former, for I was still a minor accord­ing to Itali­an law and she would not allow me the eman­cip­a­tion I had asked through our soli­cit­or. My pass­port hav­ing been seized by her and giv­en to the police, I could no longer travel abroad, so in 1966 I expat­ri­ated illeg­ally across the Alps to meet an acquaint­ance of mine, Vit­torio Chi­audano, who was then in south­ern France and was to be my first employ­er in Switzer­land. Through­out my life I have been in good terms with my father’s fam­ily, on which I could always rely when I was in Italy.

 

Tertiary education & early adulthood influences
  • Laurea” (hon­ours degree) in For­eign Lan­guages and Lit­er­at­ures (with a thes­is related to Anglo-Amer­­ic­an lit­er­at­ure; 110/110 marks), Ca’ Foscari, Uni­ver­sity of Venice (30th June 1976).
  • PhD in Tibetan Stud­ies at the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don) in 1981 with a thes­is on tra­di­tion­al reli­gious Him­alay­an sculp­ture in the 20th century

 

How did your interests dur­ing your high school develop? 

 

They did on the basis of the study of his­tory, art his­tory, philo­sophy and civics in rela­tion my first field work (1961–1962) among Itali­an immig­rants dwell­ing in the lodgings of the Tur­in Bor­ough  Assist­ance Board (ECA) under the guid­ance of my teach­er Gior­gina Levi, a Jew­ish lady who had been com­pelled to leave Italy and move to Bolivia fol­low­ing the issue of the Fas­cist  laws for the defence of the race. That kind of exper­i­ence made me real­ize even­tu­ally that the gap between intel­lec­tu­al know­ledge and real­ity may be over­come only by con­tact with real people and objects, that is field work, which would mean adding a social and anthro­po­lo­gic­al dimen­sion to my studies.

 

Why did you become inter­ested in “For­eign Lan­guages and Lit­er­at­ures” and espe­cially Eng­lish literature?

 

I was brought up in an Anglo­phile world, due to the fact that my fath­er was the son of an Eng­lish Baptist mis­sion­ary. Among my read­ings, ran­ging from Peter Pan to texts by Kip­ling, Swift, Steven­son, Twain, Fen­imore Cooper, Melville, besides Verne, Dumas, Sal­gari, the one that influ­enced me most was Robin­son Cru­soe. Hav­ing a half-Eng­l­ish fath­er, I met Eng­lish rel­at­ives at Torre Pel­lice when they came to vis­it us after the war.

 

How do you remem­ber the Itali­an aca­demia and the Uni­ver­sity of Venice as a stu­dent in the 1970s? With whom and how did you study, your teach­ers and class­mates?

 

I do not have a good recol­lec­tion of Ca’ Foscari, which I atten­ded reg­u­larly from 1966 to 1968, receiv­ing two small grants and being then com­pelled to emig­rate to French Switzer­land to work in order to sup­port my stud­ies at a time when it was dif­fi­cult to find a job in Venice. I found it easy to study with pro­fess­ors of Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure, his­tory of the Eng­lish lan­guage, French lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure, Itali­an and Lat­in lan­guages and lit­er­at­ures, Ger­man and Romance philo­logy, medi­ev­al, mod­ern and art his­tory, his­tory of philo­sophy and of the Eng­lish lan­guage, but dif­fi­cult with my pro­fess­or of Anglo-Amer­­ic­an lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure, Prof. Perosa, who was unfriendly and unne­ces­sar­ily hard, unlike all oth­er teach­ers, like prof. Zan­mar­chi (Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure) and prof. Cac­cia (Itali­an lan­guage and literature).

Of my class­mates I remem­ber in par­tic­u­lar Clau­dio Ambrosini, with whom I have kept in touch. In Venice I made friends with Piero Morandi, of Italo-Argen­tin­i­an ori­gin, who trav­elled to the east over­land as far as Afgh­anistan and Nepal, and above all with the musi­co­lo­gist Gio­vanni Morelli, in whose house I became leg­ally res­id­ent from 1968 and who encour­aged me to write my thes­is on John Cage’s writ­ings, where I found ref­er­ences to Zen, Buddhism and Hinduism.

 

When and why did you get inter­ested in Ori­ent­al Studies/Tibetan language/art?

 

In 1968, when I star­ted work­ing as a sec­ret­ary for the wid­ow of the paint­er Charles Rol­li­er in the Geneva can­ton to make an invent­ory and to organ­ize exhib­i­tions of her husband’s work, in whose lib­rary I came across for the first time with pub­lic­a­tions on Tibetan and Indi­an civil­iz­a­tions, of which I even­tu­ally com­piled an invent­ory. On the sub­ject later I pub­lished a couple of art­icles, “L’in­flu­ence du bouddhisme et des arts indi­en et chinois sur la pein­ture de Charles Rol­li­er” (in Charles Rol­li­er. Les deux phases car­dinales, Pein­tures 1955–1968, Musée Can­ton­al des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne 1984) and “The Paint­ing of Charles Rol­li­er: The Influ­ence of Indi­an Cul­ture on a European Artist” (Mârg. A Magazine of the Arts, 65/3, 2014), trans­lated into Itali­an by Guido Vogli­otti for the last exhib­i­tion I organ­ized at Torre Pel­lice, where Rol­li­er used to spend the sum­mer, in 2018.

 

What did you find so fas­cin­at­ing about it?

 

I regarded Indo-Tibetan art as belong­ing to an Indo-European tra­di­tion to which I belonged and which I should know better.

 

 

Trav­el­ler, hip­pie times… Were you in some ways influ­enced by the anti-cul­ture move­ment at that time?

 

I was indir­ectly, for I have always shunned exoti­cism and the con­form­ism of anti­con­form­ism, being cau­tious with any kind of ideo­logy or pseudo-ideo­­logy, and sus­pi­cious of cul­tur­al revolu­tions, except the Coper­nic­an and Galilean one.

 

How do you remem­ber SOAS as a stu­dent in the 1970s and 1980s and the rel­ev­ant fields of stud­ies there? 

 

SOAS with the rel­ev­ant fields of stud­ies had a pleas­ant atmo­sphere, but there were very few stu­dents of Tibetan.

My teach­ers were Philip Den­wood, Dav­id Snellgrove and a lay Tibetan lec­turer, where­as of my class mates I remem­ber only Cathy Can­t­well. We stud­ied gram­mar, syn­tax and pro­nun­ci­ation and were trans­lat­ing Tibetan texts related to art with the first, trans­lat­ing a Tibetan text on man­dalas with the second, and prac­tising con­ver­sa­tion with the third.

 

Your memor­ies of Dav­id Snellgrove as a teach­er and person?

 

High stand­ards of schol­ar­ship, intel­lec­tu­ally hon­est and help­ful (cf. my “Obit­u­ary: Dav­id Llewllyn Snellgrove — 29 June 1920 – 25 March 2016”, The Tibet Journ­al, XLIII/2 — 2018)

 

Early fieldwork in Tibet and the Himalayas

 

From 1972 he car­ried out field work in Nepal, India and Tibet. How did your field­work look like, how do you remem­ber it?

 

I remem­ber it as a tir­ing but inter­est­ing series of exper­i­ences based on travels, long stays, vis­its and inter­views to artists.

 

Why did you decide to work on reli­gious Him­alay­an sculp­ture in the 20th century? 

 

I did because the con­tem­por­ary pro­duc­tion of tra­di­tion­al reli­gious images by skilled artists should be recor­ded also to respect the feel­ings of Tibetan people, as poin­ted out by Bsod nams tshe ring, former dir­ect­or of The Tibet Journ­al, as quoted in my art­icle “Tibetan Aes­thet­ics versus West­ern Aes­thet­ics in the Appre­ci­ation of Reli­gious Art” (in M. Esposito, ed., Images of Tibet in the 19th and 20th Cen­tur­ies, École française d’Extrême-Orient, Par­is 2008, vol. II, pp. 701–2, n.70).

 

Did you do field­work with artists, how do you remem­ber this? 

 

I remem­ber it as a tir­ing but inter­est­ing exper­i­ence allow­ing to com­mu­nic­ate with mind and body, also thanks to the assist­ance of people who assisted me tak­ing pic­tures to doc­u­ment my research.

 

How do you remem­ber the artists’ scene in Nepal/India at that time?

 

I remem­ber it as a very act­ive, reli­gious and friendly world, often liv­ing in very simple con­di­tions chiefly at Lal­it­pur, in the Nepal Valley.

 

Would you also have some­thing to say about the Tibetan and Him­alay­an art trade in Nepal, India and the West at that time? 

 

I was struck by the num­ber of con­tem­por­ary images that were aged arti­fi­cially, some­times with rather soph­ist­ic­ated tech­niques, to sat­is­fy West­ern aesthetics.

 

Have you wit­nessed Tibetan art being car­ried out­side Tibet and mak­ing its way into the exile and the West? 

 

I have not, but I have wit­nessed and recor­ded the pro­duc­tion of images and the recon­struc­tion of temples as well as mon­as­ter­ies dur­ing all my unof­fi­cial field­work, trav­el­ling over­land to south­ern, cent­ral, north­ern and east­ern Tibet from 1987 to 1997 (when I reached Cheng­du trav­el­ling with my exped­i­tion from Gong-dkar) and also in 2003 and 2004, some­times lead­ing groups of tour­ists and deliv­er­ing even­ing lec­tures pre­par­ing them to the vis­its dur­ing the fol­low­ing day.

 

How have you exper­i­enced this trade and market?

 

I found it inter­est­ing, but even­tu­ally frus­trat­ing, since in the end I felt that col­lect­ing objects isol­ated from their reli­gious and cul­tur­al con­text is a bit like col­lect­ing dead butterflies.

 

 

Research, fieldwork, exhibitions

In 1972 I estab­lished the Aniko Col­lec­tion of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Geneva; since then I have organ­ized fif­teen exhib­i­tions of Asi­an art in Italy, Switzer­land and Eng­land. In 1978 I car­ried out field­work in Ladakh and the Nepal Val­ley under the spon­sor­ship of the Cent­ral Research Fund of the Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don, and in the peri­od 1980–1982 I exten­ded my research to art col­lec­tions in UK museums as well as to Sikkim and Tibetan set­tle­ments in India, thanks to a grant from the Brit­ish Academy.

In 1987 I car­ried out field­work in south-west­­ern, south­ern and cent­ral Tibet under the spon­sor­ship of CeS­MEO (Tur­in), con­cen­trat­ing my research upon the mon­as­tery and the Great Stupa of Gyantse; I returned to Tibet in 1995, 1996, 1997, and then 2003 and 2004 thanks to fund­ing from NORAD (Nor­we­gi­an Agency for Devel­op­ment Cooperation).

Under the spon­sor­ship of the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna I have car­ried out field­work in Nepal (2000), includ­ing Mus­tang (2008), as well as Ladakh, Spiti and Kun­av­ar (2001, 2002, 2003 and 2005). In 2003 and 2004 I was a mem­ber the tem­por­ary com­mit­tee for acquis­i­tions for the future Museum of Ori­ent­al Art in Turin.

Guest Research­er at the Depart­ment of the Court His­tory, Palace Museum, Beijing.

 

How did your interest and research in art develop?

 

From my child­hood, when I liked draw­ing and paint­ing, and later vis­it­ing museums, exhib­i­tions, art cit­ies and archae­olo­gic­al sites.

 

Very early on, when Tibetan and Him­alay­an art was not much stud­ied yet, you estab­lished the Aniko Col­lec­tion of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Geneva. Could you say some­thing about it?

 

My exhib­i­tions had an unex­pec­ted suc­cess in all parts of Switzerland

 

You have worked on a wide scope of art, on Tibetan, Newar and Indi­an. What do you like about art of these cultures?

 

Their poly­the­ist­ic fea­tures and non-the­ist­ic aspect of Buddhism.

 

Is there some­thing spe­cial about it for you?

 

It is an art pro­duced as a sup­port to devotees rather a nar­ciss­ist­ic expres­sion of the artist.

 

It seems you have linked research on art to field­work a lot…

 

I had the oppor­tun­ity to study artist­ic pro­duc­tions enter­ing also in the artists’ lives, some­times liv­ing in their houses and quarters.

 

Why do you find this approach important?

Because it is more related to life than intellectual.

 

Would you have a favour­ite field site(s), and why is this / are these your favourite?

 

My favour­ite site was the artists’ quarter in Lal­it­pur, because I had the oppor­tun­ity of enter­ing the artists’ world at all levels.

 

You have been involved in a great num­ber of exhib­i­tions of Tibetan art. Could you say some­thing about them, why do you like exhib­i­tions, why do you con­sider them important?

 

I con­sider them import­ant for they allow people to observe eas­ily and closely objects belong­ing to dis­tant cultures.

 

What would be your favour­ite exhib­i­tion that you’ve put togeth­er and your favour­ite art piece?

 

Tesori del Tibet: oggetti d’arte dai mon­as­teri di Lhasa” (1st March – 30th April 1994), Gal­ler­ia “Ottavo Piano”, La Rinas­cente, Piazza Duomo, Mil­ano. One of the objects I prefer is the 20th-cen­tury Newar cop­per-alloy statue of the Green Tara in my collection.

 

Could you please say some­thing about your diverse research work for vari­ous museums on Europe? 

 

(for ex. 1980–1982. Grant from the Brit­ish Academy (Lon­don) for field­work research on the col­lec­tions of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Brit­ish and Indi­an museums, and on 20th-cen­tury Tibetan and Him­alay­an art and artists in India. In 1980 I copied and trans­lated inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and Newar dates, hand­ing the rel­ev­ant inform­a­tion to the Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum and Brit­ish Museum in Lon­don, Ash­molean Museum in Oxford, Museum of Archae­ology and Anthro­po­logy in Cam­bridge, the Museum of Antiquit­ies in Liv­er­pool, Gul­ben­ki­an Museum of Ori­ent­al Art in Durham, Roy­al Scot­tish Museum in Edin­burgh, and Glas­gow Museums and Art Galleries.

In 1981 I trav­elled to India to study the Tibetan and Him­alay­an col­lec­tions in the Museum of Archae­ology of New Del­hi, in the Pat­na, Nalanda and Sarnath museums, and in Gov­ern­ment Museum in Math­ura), and to record the activ­it­ies of Tibetan and Him­alay­an artists in West Bengal and Sikkim as well as in Tibetan set­tle­ments and mon­as­ter­ies in India (Bod­hgaya, Sarnath and Karnataka) to integ­rate the research car­ried out earli­er in Ladakh and Himach­al Pradesh.)

 

My con­tacts with the Lon­don museums were the most inter­est­ing ones for they led to the pub­lic­a­tion of my “Statu­ary Metals in Tibet and the Him­alay­as”, in Wil­li­am Oddy & Wladi­mir Zwalf (eds), Aspects of Tibetan Metal­lurgy, spe­cial issue of Brit­ish Museum Occa­sion­al Papers, 15 (1981), pp. 33–67 (and Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy, 1–3 (1991), pp. 7–41), and “Cast­ing of Devo­tion­al Images in the Him­alay­as”, Brit­ish Museum Occa­sion­al Papers, 15 (1981), pp. 69–86, and Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy, 1–3 (1991), pp. 43–75, and helped in the organ­iz­a­tion of the first exhib­i­tion of Tibetan paint­ing in Italy, with painted scrolls from the V&A, “sKu-thang. Tibetan Paint­ing from the 15th to the 20th Cen­tury” (14th Octo­ber – 14th Novem­ber 1983), Centro Incon­tri della Cas­sa di Risparmio di Torino, 23 corso Stati Uniti, Turin.

 

Museum of Oriental Art in Turin

 

You were involved in the estab­lish­ment of the Museum of Ori­ent­al Art in Tur­in, which is one of the most import­ant col­lec­tions of Asi­an art in Italy. Could you say some­thing about it, please?

 

MAO was estab­lished thanks to the ini­ti­at­ive of Prof. Fanco Ricca, a schol­ar who had already been cru­cial in the found­a­tion of CeSMEO.

 

How did it all ori­gin­ate and what was your role in it?

 

It res­ul­ted from the need of put­ting togeth­er dif­fer­ent col­lec­tions of Ori­ent­al art in Tur­in, sup­ple­ment­ing them with the acquis­i­tion of objects of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in which I played a role of advisor thanks to my exper­i­ence in the subject.

 

Memories of others

 

One of your import­ant books, The Great Stupa of Gyantse. A Com­plete Tibetan Pan­theon of the Fif­teenth Cen­tury writ­ten togeth­er with Prof Franco Ricca, was pub­lished with Ser­in­dia in Lon­don (1993).

Could you say some­thing about work­ing with Anthony Aris, please?

 

It was an inter­est­ing and friendly exper­i­ence involving a jour­ney of his to the Waldensi­an Val­leys, where my present wife, Stella Rigo Righi, and I hos­ted him at our place at Luserna San Gio­vanni in 1993, before the proofs of the volume were sent to him, who in turn hos­ted us with his col­lab­or­at­ive wife, Mar­ie-Laure de Lab­riffe, at Toulouse-le-Château in the French Jura in 1993.

 

How did this book came about?

After the pub­lic­a­tion of my and Franco Ricca’s pre­vi­ous volume, Gyantse Revis­ited, fol­low­ing our first exped­i­tion to Tibet (1987), when the lat­ter came to real­ize the import­ance of the sKu- ’bum, which was my main pur­pose of that jour­ney and which had already been stud­ied by Giuseppe Tucci, who had devoted three parts of his Indo-Tibet­ica to it (1941).

 

Also, did you hap­pen to know Michael Aris?

I met him and his wife Aung San Suu Kyi in Oxford, where in 1979 I delivered my lec­ture “Him­alay­an Sac­red Art in the 20th Cen­tury”, pub­lished in Art Inter­na­tion­al two years later, receiv­ing a kind let­ter from him in 1981 in reply to inquir­ies of mine.

 

How do you remem­ber both of them?

 

I remem­ber them as very kind and cooper­at­ive persons.

 

Have you worked with Giuseppe Tucci, Hugh Richard­son, and others?

 

In my archives I keep three let­ters, one being a ref­er­ence let­ter addressed to the Itali­an For­eign Office, from Giuseppe Tucci dat­ing to 1978, as well as four let­ters from Hugh Richard­son, three of which dated from 1992 to 1995 and deal­ing with Tibet­o­lo­gic­al issues in reply to nine let­ters of mine dated from 1991 to 1996, as well as a greet­ing card dat­ing to 1993 and con­grat­u­lat­ing me on the “splen­did achieve­ment and beau­ti­fully illus­trated” volume on the Great Stupa of Gyantse. I met the former in Rome, where I accom­pan­ied Dav­id Snellgrove, and the lat­ter in Lon­don and Pied­mont, where I drove him around dur­ing his vis­it to the same.

 

You’ve been also instru­ment­al in intro­du­cing Dav­id Snellgrove to the area of the foot­hills of Itali­an Alpes, where then Dav­id Snellgrove settled (“Hav­ing retired, he pur­chased a house with a garden at Torre Pel­lice and moved there in March 1984, com­plet­ing his most import­ant work, Indo-Tibetan Buddhism (Snellgrove, 2000: 336), and in Decem­ber 2012 he retired to a flat in the hills of Luser­netta, where he was atten­ded by his friend Carl Sta­cey and by the latter’s wife.”). Were you close friends? 

 

Yes, we were.

 

Were you togeth­er with Dav­id Snellgrove in his final years?

 

I was until 1996, when I moved to Istan­bul, but we met occa­sion­ally after I returned to Italy fol­low­ing my appoint­ment at Bologna University.

Tibetan and Himalayan Studies

 

Could you tell us a bit more about Tibetan Stud­ies in Italy and Bologna in general?

 

In Bologna my course dis­ap­peared after my retire­ment and has not been replaced fol­low­ing the absorp­tion of my depart­ment into a lar­ger one.

 

The devel­op­ments and changes of Tibetan Stud­ies in the West / Italy / Bologna and in general? 

 

Tibetan stud­ies have increased at the Uni­ver­sity of Naples, where Prof. Giac­omella Orofino is par­tic­u­larly act­ive with her stu­dents, hav­ing dir­ect con­tacts with Tibet also thanks to Asso­ciazione Italia-Tibet, where­as at Rome Uni­ver­sity Tibetan lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion are now taught by Dona­tella Rossi.

 

 

Changes of the­or­et­ic­al dis­courses and approaches? 

 

The lat­ter seem to be gen­er­ally cul­tur­al when com­pared with Prof. Luciano Petech’s strictly his­tor­ic­al ones.

 

How were you involved/positioned in it?

 

I con­trib­uted as a teach­er, lec­turer, author of art­icles, edit­or of pro­ceed­ings and organ­izer of a con­fer­ence at Gabin­etto Vieus­seux, Florence.

 

Changes of research approaches / inter­pret­at­ive frame­works in Tibetan and Him­alay­an Stud­ies in gen­er­al? // to Tibetan and Him­alay­an art?

 

There have not been many. As poin­ted out by Franco Ricca and Guido Vogli­otti in the pre­face to their recent his­tory of early Tibet (Stor­ia del Tibet. Mon­ar­chia e impero nel VI-IX secolo, Aless­andria 2018, p. 1),  the acquis­i­tion of new inform­a­tion on Tibetan his­tory has not led to an adequate com­pet­ence in his­tor­ic­al phe­nom­ena, the lim­it­a­tions and obstacles being at least partly due to an atti­tude towards the Tibetan world that has often priv­ileged its magical/religious aspects rather than its eco­nom­ic, social, his­tor­ic­al and polit­ic­al ones: “The fas­cin­a­tion for a coun­try felt as a mys­ter­i­ous repos­it­ory of extraordin­ary wis­dom has been exer­ted not only on aver­­age-low cul­tur­al levels, but has inves­ted also cul­tur­ally and sci­en­tific­ally qual­i­fied milieux”, some­times enchanted by the Tibetan reli­gious tra­di­tion in envir­on­ments at least partly influ­enced by the New Age, with pub­lic­a­tions inspired by mem­bers belong­ing to the vari­ous Buddhist schools of the Tibetan dia­spora. Remark­able excep­tions are rep­res­en­ted by works such as Per Sørensen’s Tibetan Buddhist His­tori­ography. The Mir­ror Illu­min­at­ing the Roy­al Gene­a­lo­gies.

The same applies to Tibetan art his­tory. In his intro­duc­tion to Kongtrul’s Encyc­lo­pae­dia of Tibetan Cul­ture (New Del­hi, 1970, p. 52) Gene Smith had already warned that “The pon­ti­fic­a­tions of emin­ent museo­lo­gists and art his­tor­i­ans regard­ing the char­ac­ter­ist­ics and dates of the vari­ous styles and schools rep­res­ent noth­ing but unin­formed guesses.”

More recently the greatest Tibet­o­lo­gist expert in Tibetan paint­ing, Dav­id Jack­son, in his The Place of Proven­ance. Region­al Styles in Tibetan Paint­ing, with a con­tri­bu­tion by Rob Lin­roth, argues that Tibetan art his­tory and con­cludes that hopes for improv­ing its dis­cip­line “will be noth­ing but a dream” unless “young­er schol­ars were to begin apply­ing a sounder his­tor­ic­al meth­od, reject­ing inex­act and unre­li­able meth­ods of the past” (p.19). A good example of the present unsat­is­fact­ory situ­ation may be provided by the fact that in recent books on the Potala many mur­als from the 1920s were wrongly dated in the cap­tions to the 1640s (pp. 33–34). Chapters three and four, far from the anti­quar­i­an aes­thet­ics pre­vail­ing in the West­ern world, include the 20th-cen­tury pro­duc­tion in Tibet prop­er, Ladakh as well as Nepal (pp. 33, 34, 39, 49, 70–72, 80–81, 91–92, 105, 108, 111–112).

Examples of 20th-cen­tury paint­ings and paint­ers are dealt with also in chapter six (pp. 146–147 and 149–150), con­firm­ing that Jack­son shuns the pre­val­ently anti­quar­i­an aes­thet­ics in the West.

How would you say these fields of stud­ies / degrees taught have changed (since you were a student)? 

There seems to be less dis­tance between teach­ers and students.

Additional info

Erberto Lo Bue was Asso­ci­ate Pro­fess­or in Indo­logy and Tibet­o­logy at the Depart­ment of Ori­ent­al and Lin­guist­ic Stud­ies of the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna, where he taught his­tory of Indi­an and Cent­ral Asi­an Art as well as clas­sic­al Tibetan.

He obtained his Ph. D. in Tibetan Stud­ies at the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don) in 1981 with a thes­is on Him­alay­an sculp­ture in the 20 th cen­tury. After the first of a num­ber of jour­neys to Nepal, in 1972 he estab­lished the Aniko Col­lec­tion of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Geneva; since then he has organ­ized fif­teen exhib­i­tions of Asi­an art in Italy, Switzer­land and Eng­land. In 1978 he car­ried out field­work in Ladakh and the Nepal Val­ley under the spon­sor­ship of the Cent­ral Research Fund of the Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don, and in the peri­od 19801982 he exten­ded his research to art col­lec­tions in U. K. museums as well as to Sikkim and Tibetan set­tle­ments in India, thanks to a grant from the Brit­ish Academy. In 1987 he car­ried out field­work in south-west­­ern, south­ern and cent­ral Tibet under the spon­sor­ship of CeS­MEO (Tur­in), con­cen­trat­ing his research upon the mon­as­tery and the Great Stupa of Gyantse; he returned to Tibet in 1995, 1996, 1997, and then 2003 and 2004 thanks to fund­ing from NORAD (Nor­we­gi­an Agency for Devel­op­ment Cooperation).

Between 1983 and 1996 he taught Tibetan lan­guage, lit­er­at­ure as well as cul­tur­al and art his­tory at the uni­ver­sit­ies of Tur­in, Mil­an and Bologna, and at CeS­MEO; from 1997 to 1999 he taught in Istan­bul on behalf of the Itali­an For­eign Office. He qual­i­fied as research asso­ci­ate at the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna in 1999 and as asso­ci­ate pro­fess­or in 2002. Under the spon­sor­ship of the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna he has car­ried out field­work in Nepal (2000), includ­ing Mus­tang (2008), as well as Ladakh, Spiti and Kun­av­ar (2001, 2002, 2003 and 2005). In 2003 and 2004 he was a mem­ber the tem­por­ary com­mit­tee for the future Museo d’Arte Ori­entale in Turin.

Most of his over 200 pub­lic­a­tions are related to Asi­an stud­ies, and in par­tic­u­lar to Tibetan, Newar and Indi­an art, with a spe­cial interest in con­tem­por­ary reli­gious artist­ic tra­di­tions in the Him­alay­as; they include books and exhib­i­tion cata­logues, art­icles and reviews in inter­na­tion­al peri­od­ic­als — Acta Ori­entalia, Arts Asi­atiques, Asi­at­ica Vene­tiana, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy, East and West, Marg, Ori­ent­al Art, The Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety and The Tibet Journ­al — as well as entries for encyc­lo­paed­ic dictionaries.

Erberto Lo Bue was a mem­ber of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies as well as Guest Research­er at the Depart­ment of the Court His­tory, Palace Museum, Beijing.

Curriculum vitae

 

SURNAME: Lo Bue

FORENAMES: Erberto Francesco Michele

DATE OF BIRTH: 30th July, 1946

NATIONALITY: Itali­an

ADDRESSES

24/4 Viale Dante, 10066 Torre Fel­lice, Torino, Italy tel. 0039–0121–953040

e‑mail: erberto.lobue@unibo.it

e_lobue@yahoo.it

 

UNIVERSITY DEGREES AND QUALIFICATIONS

  • Laurea” (hon­ours degree) in For­eign Lan­guages and Lit­er­at­ures (with a thes­is related to Anglo- Amer­ic­an lit­er­at­ure; 110/110 marks), Ca’ Foscari, Uni­ver­sity of Venice (30th June 1976).
  • D. in Tibetan stud­ies, School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don (18th Novem­ber 1981).
  • Qual­i­fic­a­tions of research­er at the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna (90/100 marks; 1st Octo­ber 1999) and seni­or research­er (1st Octo­ber 2002).
  • Qual­i­fic­a­tion of asso­ci­ate pro­fess­or obtained at the Uni­ver­sity “La Sapi­enza”, Roma (10th Octo­ber 2002) and recog­nized by the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna (9th Septem­ber 2004).

 

AFFILIATIONS

Mem­ber of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies since August 1989.

Mem­ber of the Tibet Soci­ety since Decem­ber 1992.

Mem­ber of the Shalu Asso­ci­ation since August 1996.

Mem­ber of the advis­ory board of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies from July 2003 to 2012.

Mem­ber of The Tibet Journ­al edit­or­i­al board from the sum­mer of 2006 and of the School of Doc­tor­ate in Euras­i­an Stud­ies of the Uni­ver­sity of Tur­in from the autumn of the same year until 2012.

Guest Research­er at the Depart­ment of the Court His­tory of the Palace Museum of Beijing since

2009.

Mem­ber of the sci­entif­ic com­mit­tee for the cen­ten­ary of Fosco Marami’s birth (1912) from the 12th May 2011 to 2012, in charge with the organ­iz­a­tion of a con­fer­ence on Tibet.

 

LIST OF POSTS AND TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS (see also under EXHIBITIONS below):

2011–2012.

Respons­ible for the course of Indo­logy and pres­id­ent of MA degree board at the Depart­ment of Lin­guist­ic and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Bologna.

2011–2012.

  • Mem­ber­ship in the sci­entif­ic com­mit­tee of the “Gabin­etto Sci­en­ti­fico Let­ter­ario G. P. Vieus­seux” in Florence for the cen­ten­ary of Fosco Marami’s birth (1912) since the 12th May 2011, in charge with the organ­iz­a­tion of a con­fer­ence on Tibet.

From 2012. Hon­or­ary mem­ber­ship in the “Asso­ci­ation Charles Rol­li­er” in Geneva.

2005–2012.

  • Asso­ci­ate Pro­fess­or­ship in Tibet­o­logy at the Depart­ment of Lin­guist­ic and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Bologna.

2004–2012.

- Asso­ci­ate Pro­fess­or­ship in Indi­an and Cent­ral Asi­an art his­tory at the Depart­ment of Lin­guist­ic and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Bologna.

1999–2010.

  • Lec­ture­ship in Indi­an and Cent­ral Asi­an art his­tory entrus­ted to him in his capa­city as full-time reseach­er at the Depart­ment of Lin­guist­ic and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Bologna.
  • Sci­entif­ic con­sultancy for identi­fy­ing Tibetan and Nakhi manu­scripts in the lib­rary of the seat of the Gran San Bemando can­ons in Mar­tigny, Switzer­land (31st July 2007).
  • Mem­ber­ship in the advis­ory board for acquis­i­tions of images for the future Museum of Ori­ent­al Art in Tur­in (Tur­in Town Coun­cil and Pied­mont Region; 2002–2003).
  • Plan­ning of half a dozen exhib­i­tion rooms for the Museum of Asi­an Arts in the Mal­grà Castle, Rivarolo Canavese (2002–2003).
  • Sci­entif­ic con­sultan­cies for the exhib­i­tions “Stru­menti di Med­itazione. Thang-ka. Anti­chi dip­inti reli­gi­osi tibetani” (lst-30th Octo­ber, Eth­noarte, Mil­ano), “Tibet. Arte e spir­itu­al­ità. Un con­trib­uto alla stor­ia dell’uomo” (21st Octo­ber 1999 — 9th Janu­ary 2000, Gal­ler­ia della Bes­ana, Mil­an) and “Tibet. Arte e Spir­itu­al­ità” (Rivarolo Canavese, spring 2003).
  • Con­sultancy for the art his­tor­ic­al part in the pro­duc­tion of the CD-ROM Arte in Tibet, Min­is­tero dei Beni e delle Attiv­ità Cul­tur­ali & Isti­tuto Shang Shung (2000) and for the Brit­ish tele­vi­sion ITV for a broad­cast on the Potala palace (August 2010).
  • Train­ing of guides for the exhib­i­tion “Tibet. Arte e spir­itu­al­ità. Un con­trib­uto alla stor­ia dell’uomo” organ­ized by ARDEA, Mil­an (13th and 29th Octo­ber 1999).
  • Art expert­ises for Vit­torio Tavec­chia (Rho; Decem­ber 1999), Renzo Fres­chi (Ori­ent­al Art, Mil­an; Feb­ru­ary 2000 and April 2002), Gian­franco Rossi (Eth­noarte, Mil­an; May-June 2002), Fosco Marami (Florence; July 2002), Marco Abbi­ati and Fer­ruc­cio Pil­ati (L’Asia, San Giuli­ano Nuovo* Septem­ber 2002), Andrea Fil­ippi (Etimo­lo­gica, Forlì; March 2010), Ant­o­nio Ripar­iti (Cesena, 30May 2010), Claudi­us Müller (dir­ect­or of the Staat­liches Museum für Völkerkunde, München; July 2010).

1997–1999.

Appoint­ment by the Itali­an For­eign Office to teach Eng­lish and Amer­ic­an lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at the Itali­an Lyceum in Istanbul.

1995–1997.

  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Liceo Sci­en­ti­fico “Maria Curie” of Pinerolo.
  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan art his­tory at CeS­MEO (CeS­MEO (Centro Piemontese di Studi sul Medio ed Estremo Ori­ente — Isti­tuto Intem­azionale di Studi Asi­atici Avan­zati), Turin.

1995–1996. Teach­er­ship in Tibetan art his­tory at CeS­MEO, Turin.

1994–1995.

  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan art his­tory at CeS­MEO, Turin.
  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship to teach Tibetan lan­guage at the Insti­tute of Glot­to­logy and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Milan.

-Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Liceo Sci­en­ti­fico “Maria Curie” of Pinerolo.

  • Organ­iz­a­tion of two exhib­i­tions of Tibetan art, one in Mil­an and the oth­er in Mod­ena (Feb­ru­ary- April 1994).

1993–1994.

  • Teach­er­ship in Indi­an and Tibetan art his­tory at CeS­MEO, Turin.
  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship to teach Tibetan lan­guage and cul­tur­al his­tory at the Insti­tute of Glot­to­logy and Ori­ent­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Milan.

1992–1994.

  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto Tec­nico “Leon Bat­tista Alberti” of Lusema San Gio­vanni (Torre Pel­lice branch).

1991–1992.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship to teach Tibetan art his­tory and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto di Glot­to­lo­gia, Uni­ver­sity of Bologna.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto Tec­nico “Leon Bat­tista Alberti” of Lusema San Gio­vanni (Torre Eel­lice branch).

1990–1991.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Glot­to­lo­gia e Lingue Ori­ent­ali, Uni­ver­sity of Milan.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto Tec­nico “Leon Bat­tista Alberti” of Lusema San Gio­vanni (Torre Pel­lice branch).
  • Organ­iz­a­tion of an exhib­i­tion of tra­di­tion­al Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Mil­an (Octo­ber 1991).

1989–1990.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Glot­to­lo­gia e Lingue Ori­ent­ali, Uni­ver­sity of Milan.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto Pro­fes­sionale per il Com­mer­cio “Valentino Bosso” of Tur­in (Torre Pel­lice branch).

1988–1989.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Glot­to­lo­gia e Lingue Ori­ent­ali, Uni­ver­sity of Milan.
  • Detach­ment” by the Min­istry of Pub­lic Edu­ca­tion, to carry out a research on the mon­ast­ic enclave of Gyantse at Isti­tuto di Ori­ent­al­ist­ica, Uni­ver­sity of Turin.
  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.

1987–1988.

  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and civil­iz­a­tion at Isti­tuto Pro­fes­sionale per il Com­mer­cio “Valentino Bosso” of Tur­in (Torre Pel­lice branch).

1986–1987.

Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.

1985–1986.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Ori­ent­al­ist­ica, Uni­ver­sity of Turin.
  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish and French lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Gin­n­a­s­io-Liceo Clas­sico and Liceo Lin­guist­ico of Col­le­gio Valdese at Torre Pellice.

1984–1985.

  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeSMEO.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Gin­n­a­s­io-Liceo Clas­sico and Liceo Lin­guist­ico of Col­le­gio Valdese at Torre Pellice.

1983–1984.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Ori­ent­al­ist­ica, Uni­ver­sity of Turin.
  • Teach­er­ship in Eng­lish lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Gin­n­a­s­io-Liceo Clas­sico and Liceo Lin­guist­ico of Col­le­gio Valdese (Waldensi­an Col­lege) at Torre Pel­lice (Tur­in).

1982–1983.

  • Tem­por­ary pro­fess­or­ship of Tibetan lan­guage and lit­er­at­ure at Isti­tuto di Ori­ent­al­ist­ica, Uni­ver­sity of Turin.
  • Teach­er­ship in Tibetan lan­guage and cul­ture at CeS­MEO in Turin.

 

 

Part-time translating, researching and consultancy jobs for:

  1. Brendan Lynch, Antiquit­ies Depart­ment, Sotheby’s, Lon­don (trans­la­tion without trans­lit­er­a­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and his­tor­ic­al research)
  2. Philip Gold­man, Ken­wood House, 30 Cyprus Road, Finch­ley, Lon­don (trans­la­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and his­tor­ic­al research, 1982);
  3. Arturo Schwarz, Via M. Giuri­ati 17, Mil­an (trans­la­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Itali­an and his­tor­ic­al research, 1983);
  4. Pro­fess­or Franco Ricca, Via Madama Cristina 49, Tur­in (con­sult­ant for the exhib­i­tion “Pit­tura buddhista tibetana” organ­ized by the Pied­mont Region, 1984).
  5. John Lowry, Indi­an Depart­ment, Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum, South Kens­ing­ton, Lon­don SW7 2RL (trans­la­tion of three texts from Tibet into Eng­lish 1978–1980);
  6. Ulrich Von Schroeder, for his pub­lic­a­tion Indo-Tibetan Bronzes, Hong Kong, Visu­al Dharma Pub­lic­a­tions, 1981, 576 pp. (trans­la­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and his­tor­ic­al research, 1980 — 1981);
  7. Anthony Thompson, Indi­an and Islam­ic Depart­ment, Christie’s, 8 King St., St. James’s, Lon­don SW1Y 6QT (trans­la­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and his­tor­ic­al research, 1978– 1982);
  8. Anthony Gard­ner, Ori­ent­al Depart­ment, Spink’s, 5–7 King St., St. James’s, Lon­don SW1Y 6QS (trans­la­tion of inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and his­tor­ic­al research, 1978–1982).

1971–1984.

  • Cur­at­or­ship of the Aniko Col­lec­tion of Tibetan and Him­alay­an Art, Case Postale 178, CH — 1214 Ver­ni­er, Svizzera. Organ­iz­a­tion of exhib­i­tions in Geneva (1973–1974, 1974–1975, 1976), Zurich (1974, 1975), La Chaux-de-Fonds (1977–1978) and Lon­don (1978, 1980).
  • Trans­la­tion of Tibetan texts for the Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum, Lon­don, and of Tibetan inscrip­tions for Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Spink’s, London.

1970. Sec­ret­ari­al job at the Centre Inter­na­tion­al de Recherches et Con­front­a­tions Artistiques, for Mrs. Jac­queline Jean­ner­et, Rue Saint-Laurent 2, CH-1207 Ginev­ra, Svizzera.

1968–1969. Research on behalf of the Depart­ment di Para­psy­cho­logy of I. A. A. Anstalt, Route de 1’Etraz 54, CH-1260 Nyon, Switzer­land, and con­tri­bu­tion to The Open Index, Nyon, I. A. A. Anstalt, 1972, X- 190 pp.

 

 

CURATORSHIP OF EXHIBITIONS ON CHARLES ROLLIER

  • Galer­ie D. Ben­ador, “Hom­mage à Charles Rol­li­er”, Genève (24th June 1968 as col­lab­or­at­or of Mme Gisèle Rollier);
  • Salle Simon Patino, “Charles Rol­li­er”, Genève (28th Novem­ber 1968 — 4th Janu­ary 1969 as col­lab­or­at­or of Mme Gisèle Rollier);
  • Musée Rath, “Charles Rol­li­er, huiles, gou­ache et dess­ins”, Genève (16th May — 15th June 1969 as col­lab­or­at­or of Mme Gisèle Rollier);
  • Galer­ie L’En­tracte, Lausanne (25th July — 5th Septem­ber 1969 as col­lab­or­at­or of Mme Gisèle Rollier);
  • Civica Gal­ler­ia d’arte con­tem­por­anea Fil­ippo Scroppo, “Charles Rol­li­er”, Torre Pel­lice (16th June — 9th Septem­ber 2018).

CURATORSHIP OF EXHIBITIONS OF ASIAN ART:

  • Tan­tra” (15th Decem­ber 1972 — 23rd Janu­ary 1973), Galer­ie du C. I. R. C. A., 5 rue Pierre- Fatio, Geneva
  • Art tìbé­tain et him­alay­en” (27th Novem­ber 1973 — 26th Janu­ary 1974), Galer­ie du C. I. R. C.A., 5 rue Pierre-Fatio, Geneva
  • Kunst-Objecte aus Tibet und Nepal” (26th April — 25th May 1974), Galer­ie 38, 38 Kirch­gasse, Zurich
  • Images of Tan­tra: Nepal — Tibet — India” (28th Novem­ber 1974 — 24th Janu­ary 1975), Galer­ie Aurora, 8 rue de l’Athénée, Geneva
  • Sakrale Kunst aus Tibet — Nepal — Indi­en” (22nd Feb­ru­ary — 15th March 1975), Galer­ie 38, 38 Kirch­gasse, Zurich
  • Inde — Nepal — Tibet. Art et cul­ture”, Lib­rair­ie-Galer­­ie Dèdale (10th June — 15th Septem­ber 1976), 8 Aven­ue Pic­t­et-de-Rochemont, Geneva
  • Images du Tan­tra. Art de 1’Himalaya, du Tibet et de 1’Inde” (26th Novem­ber 1977 — 14th Janu­ary 1978), Galer­ie du Club 44, 64 Rue de la Serre, La Chaux-de-Fonds
  • Tibetan and Him­alay­an Art” (23rd March — 28th June 1978), S. O. A. S., Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don, 8 Malet Street, London
  • Tibetan and Him­alay­an Arts and Crafts: Past and Present” (4th Octo­ber 1979 — 19th March 1980), S. O. A. S., Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don, 8 Malet Street, London
  • sKu-thang. Tibetan Paint­ing from the 15th to the 20th Cen­tury” (14th Octo­ber — 14th Novem­ber 1983), Centro Incon­tri della Cas­sa di Risparmio di Torino, 23 corso Stati Uniti, Turin
  • Tibet: dimora degli dei” (2nd ‑26th Octo­ber 1991), Gal­ler­ia “Ottavo Piano”, La Rinas­cente, Piazza Duomo, Milan
  • Le Montagne Sac­re. Anti­ca Arte del Tibet” (12th Feb­ru­ary — 20th March 1994), Palazzo Comun­ale, Piazza Grande, Modena
  • Tesori del Tibet: oggetti d’arte dai mon­as­teri di Lhasa” (1st March — 30th Aprii 1994), Gal­ler­ia “Ottavo Piano”, La Rinas­cente, Piazza Duomo, Milano.
  • Tibet. Oltre la leg­genda. Civiltà ed arte dal XII al XX secolo” (4th May — 13th July 2003), Cas­tello Mal­grà, Rivarolo Canavese.
  • India, Gre­cia dell’Asia. Tesori d’arte del sub­con­tin­ente indi­ano dal III mil­len­nio a. C. al XIX sec. d. C.” (27th June — 2nd Novem­ber 2003), Fil­atoio, Caraglio.

 

FIELDWORK GRANTS AND AWARDS:

1966–1967, 1967–1968 and 1971. Two grants and one schol­ar­ship from the Uni­ver­sity of Venice

1972; 1973; 1974; 1975. Spon­sor­ship by I.A.A. Anstalt (Nyon) to carry out research aimed at the col­lec­tion of reli­gious images and objects as well as of domest­ic items, and to the study of tech­niques and mater­i­als used in Newar statu­ary in the Nepal Val­ley (1972–1974), and on offi­cin­al plants used for cere­mo­ni­al pur­poses in Vol-mo (Hel­ambu, 10–11.1975).

  • Mil­li­­cent-Har­ring­ton Schol­ar­ship (S. O. A. S., Uni­ver­sity of London)
  1. Research grant from the Cent­ral Research Fund of the Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don to carry out field­work on Him­alay­an art and artists in Ladakh and in the Nepal Valley
  • Mil­li­cent Har­ring­ton Schol­ar­ship (S. O. A. S., Uni­ver­sity of London)
  1. B. C. Law Prize for Buddhist Stud­ies (S. O. A. S., Uni­ver­sity of London)

1980–1982. Grant from the Brit­ish Academy (Lon­don) for field­work research on the col­lec­tions of Tibetan and Him­alay­an art in Brit­ish and Indi­an museums, and on 20th-cen­tury Tibetan and Him­alay­an art and artists in India. In 1980 he copied and trans­lated inscrip­tions from Tibetan into Eng­lish and Newar dates, hand­ing the rel­ev­ant inform­a­tion to the Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum and Brit­ish Museum in Lon­don, Ash­molean Museum in Oxford, Museum of Arche­ology and Anthro­po­logy in Cam­bridge, the Museum of Antiquit­ies in Liv­er­pool, Gul­ben­ki­an Museum of Ori­ent­al Art in Durham, Roy­al Scot­tish Museum in Edin­burgh, and Glas­gow Museums and Art Gal­ler­ies. In 1981 he trav­elled to India to study the Tibetan and Him­alay­an col­lec­tions in the Museum of Archae­ology of New Del­hi, in the Pat­na, Nalanda and Samath museums, and in Gov­ern­ment Museum in Math­ura), and to record the activ­it­ies of Tibetan and Him­alay­an artists in West Bengal and Sikkim as well as in Tibetan set­tle­ments and mon­as­ter­ies in India (Bod­hgaya, Samath and Karnataka) to integ­rate the researches car­ried out earli­er in Ladak and Himach­al Pradesh.

  1. Field­work research grant from CeS­MEO (Tur­in) for a sur­vey on the present state of pre­ser­va­tion of the chief mon­as­ter­ies of cent­ral and south­ern Tibet, with par­tic­u­lar ref­er­ence to the sKu-‘bum and gTsug-lag-khang of Gyantse.
  2. Fund­ing from the Nar­itas­an Shin­shoji to par­ti­cip­ate in the 5th Inter­na­tion­al Sem­in­ar on Tibetan Stud­ies, Nar­ita, Japan (27th August — 2nd Septem­ber, 1989).
  3. Fund­ing from the Insti­tut­tet for Sam­men­lign­ende Kul­turfor­skning in Oslo to par­ti­cip­ate in the 6th Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Fagemes, Nor­way (21st — 28th August, 1992).
  4. Fund­ing from the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don) to par­ti­cip­ate in the con­fer­ence “Towards a Defin­i­tion of Style: The Arts of Tibet”, Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum, Lon­don (13th — 17th June, 1994).
  5. Fund­ing from the Insti­tut fur Kul­tur- und Geistes­geschichte Asi­ens (Öster­reichis­che Akademie der Wis­senschaften) to par­ti­cip­ate in the 7th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Schloss Seg­gau, Leib­n­itz (Graz) (18th-24th June, 1995).
  6. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to carry out field­work on tra­di­tion­al Buddhist Newar sculptors in the Nepal Val­ley (Decem­ber 2000).
  7. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to carry out field­work on tra­di­tion­al Buddhist artists in Ladakh (5th Septem­ber — 18th Octo­ber 2001).
  8. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to carry out field­work in Ladakh as part of the nation­al inter-uni­ver­­s­ity research pro­ject, “Places of the liv­ing — Places of the dead” (August 2002).
  9. Fund­ing from the Art Insti­tute of Chica­go to take part in the sym­posi­um organ­ized on the occa­sion of the open­ing of the exhib­i­tion “Him­alay­as. An Aes­thet­ic Adven­ture” (Chica­go, 4th-8th April 2003).
  • Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to carry out field­work in Indi­an Tibet as part of the nation­al inter-uni­ver­­s­ity research pro­ject, “Places of the liv­ing — Places of the dead” (August 2003), and to take part in the 11th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (Leh, 21st—25th July 2003) and in the 10th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies (Oxford, 6th-12th Septem­ber 2003).
  • Fund­ing from NORAD (Nor­we­gi­an Agency for Devel­op­ment Cooper­a­tion), through NUFU and NUCTN, to attend the Lhasa Con­ser­va­tion Work­shop 2003 organ­ized by the Tibet-Nor­way Uni­ver­sity Net­work through the Uni­ver­sit­ies of Ber­gen, Oslo and Trond­heim, and hos­ted by the Arts Depart­ment and Engin­eer­ing Col­lege of Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa, 12th-17th Octo­ber 2003).
  • Fund­ing from the Circle of Tibetan and Him­alay­an Stud­ies to attend the sym­posi­um “Power, Wealth and Art. The Mon­gol Pat­ron­age of Tibetan Cul­ture” at the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Lon­don, 8th Novem­ber 2003).
  1. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the 2nd Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tibetan Archae­ology and Arts (Beijing, Cap­it­al Nor­mal Uni­ver­sity, 4th-6th Septem­ber 2004).
  • Fund­ing from NORAD (Nor­we­gi­an Agency for Devel­op­ment Cooper­a­tion), through NUFU and NUCTN, to attend the Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tra­di­tion­al Archi­tec­ture and Mur­als Con­ser­va­tion organ­ized by the Tibet Uni­ver­sity in Lhasa and the Tibet-Nor­way Uni­ver­sity Net­work through the Uni­ver­sity of Trond­heim, and hos­ted by the Arts Depart­ment and Engin­eer­ing Col­lege of Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa, 23rd-29® Septem­ber 2004).
  • Grant from the Pied­mont Region to attend the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Reli­gioni e Sac­ri Monti” (Torino, Mon­calvo and Casale Mon­fer­rato, 12th-16th Octo­ber 2004).
  1. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the 12th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (Lar­gii, 12st-15® July 2005) and to carry on field­work in Cent­ral Ladakh.
  2. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the 11® Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies (König­swinter, 28® August — 1st Septem­ber 2006) and in the 3rd Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tibetan Archae­ology and Arts (Beijing, Cap­it­al Nor­mal Uni­ver­sity, 13®-16® Octo­ber 2006).
  3. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the 13® Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (Rome, 7®- 11® Septem­ber 2007).
  • Fund­ing from ASIA (Asso­ci­ation for Inter­na­tion­al Solid­ar­ity in Asia) to take part in the inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar “Mur­al Paint­ing Con­ser­va­tion” (Rome, Isti­tuto Cent­rale per il Res­tauro, 22nd June 2007) and in the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Cul­tur­al Her­it­age and Sus­tain­able Devel­op­ment of His­tor­ic Cit­ies in Asia: Safe­guard­ing tra­di­tions and ancient know­ledge to pro­mote devel­op­ment” in Ber­lin (Ber­lin Uni­ver­sity of Tech­no­logy and Hum­boldt Uni­ver­sity, 4–5® Decem­ber 2007).
  1. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to carry out research on 15® and 16®-century Buddhist art in Lo (Mus­tang, Septem­ber 2008).
  2. Fund­ing from ASIA (Asso­ci­ation for Inter­na­tion­al Solid­ar­ity in Asia) to take part in the inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar “From Thang­kas to Poke­mon Buddha. A Jour­ney through Tibetan Paint­ing” (Naples, 3rd March 2009).
  • Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the col­loqui­um “La cre­ation artistique face aux con­traintes poli­tiques et reli­gieuses de 1’Himalaya à l’Asie Cent­rale de l’antiquité à nos jours” organ­ized by the Société Européenne pour l’Étude des Civil­isa­tions de l’Himalaya et de l’Asie Cent­rale at the Collège de France (27®-28® Aprii 2009) in Par­is, where he chaired a ses­sion, and to carry out research at the Musée d’arts asi­atiques “Guimet” in Par­is (Par­is, 24®-26® April 2009).
  • Fund­ing from THUNDER (Trans-Him­alay­an Uni­ver­sity Net­work for Edu­ca­tion and Research) to take part in the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Tra­di­tion­al Set­tle­ments and Hous­ing in Tibet Autonom­ous Region (TAR), China and Nepal” organ­ized by THUNDER in cooper­a­tion with Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa), Trib­huvan Uni­ver­sity (Kath­mandu) and the Nor­we­gi­an Uni­ver­sity of Sci­ence and Tech­no­logy (Trond­heim) at Lal­it­pur (Godav­ari Vil­lage Resort, 26®-28® Octo­ber 2009, and Insti­tute of Engin­eer­ing, 29®-30® Octo­ber 2009).
  1. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sit­ies of Rome and Bologna to take part in the sem­in­ar “Arte Tibetana tra pas­sato e presente”, Dipar­ti­mento di Studi Ori­ent­ali della “Sapi­enza”, Uni­versità di Roma (3rd Novem­ber 2010).
  2. Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sit­ies of Oxford and Bologna to deliv­er the third in a series of lec­tures on “Tibet Art: Cul­ture at Cross­roads” con­vened by Ulrike Roesler and Clare Har­ris, and sponsored by the Sub-Fac­ulty of Inner and South Asi­an Stud­ies of the Uni­ver­sity of Oxford and the Pitt Rivers Museum (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, 23rdMay 2011).
  • Fund­ing from Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to take part in the col­loqui­um “Poli­tique et reli­gions en Him­alaya et Asie Cent­rale. L’expression poli­tique et reli­gieuse de la souveraineté en Him­alaya et en Asie Cent­rale: rituels, textes, rep­res­ent­a­tions, insti­tu­tions, de l’antiquité à nos jours” organ­ized by the Société Européenne pour l’Étude des Civil­isa­tions de l’Himalaya et de l’Asie Cent­rale (Museo Nazionale d’Arte Ori­entale, Rome, 10®-11® Octo­ber 2011) and in the round table “Avalokiteévara in India and Cent­ral Asia” (Museo Nazionale d’Arte Ori­entale, Rome, 12® Octo­ber 2011).
  • Fund­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to com­plete a research on the pic­tures taken by Fosco Marami in Tibet and kept at the Archi­vio Con­tem­por­an­eo “Aless­andro Bonsanti”, Florence (13th Decem­ber 2011 — 3rd Feb­ru­ary 2012).
  1. Fund­ing from Uni­ver­sity of Bologna to com­plete a research on the role played by tan­tric Hinduism and Buddhism on the paint­er Charles Rol­li­er in his home at Chéne-Bourg, Switzer­land (22.07–29.09.2012).

 

OVERSEAS CULTURAL JOURNEYS AND FIELDWORK:

1967 Tunisia;

  • Tur­key;
  • Tur­key, Afgh­anistan and Iran;
  • Bolivia and Peru;

1972, 1973 and 1974 Nepal;

1975 Uttar Pra­desh, Maha­rashtra, Bihar and Nepal (Yol-mo);

1976–1977 Israel;

  • Nepal;
  • Kash­mir, Ladakh, Himach­al Pra­desh and Nepal;

1981–1982 Uttar Pra­desh, Bihar, Sikkim, Bengal, Maha­rashtra, Mad­hya Pra­desh and Karnataka;

  • Nepal;
  • Tibet and Nepal;

1989 Japan;

  • Tibet and Nepal;
  • Tibet and Nepal;

1997–1999 Tur­key and Jordania:

  • Tibet and China;
  • Nepal;
  • and 2002 Ladak;
  • S. A., Ladak, Lahul, Spiti, Kun­av­ar and Tibet;
  • China and Tibet;
  • Ladak;
  • China;
  • Nepal (Mus­tang);

MAIN LECTURES AND PAPERS:

  • Him­alay­an Sac­red Art in the 20th Cen­tury”, Con­fer­ence on Recent Work in the Art and Archae­ology of South Asia 1979, Wolf­son Col­lege, Uni­ver­sity of Oxford, Oxford, U. K. (14th Septem­ber, 1979)
  • The Princes of Gyantse and Their Build­ing Activ­ity”, 5th Inter­na­tion­al Sem­in­ar on Tibetan Stud­ies, Nar­itas­an Shin­shoji, Nar­ita, Japan (31st August 1989)
  • Aspects of Tibetan Art His­tory”, Uni­ver­sity of Venice (13th-14th May, 1991)
  • I Prin­cipi di Gyantse, mecenati delle arti nel Tibet del XV secolo”, Nation­al Lib­rary of Tur­in (7th May 1991).
  • Ma-gcig Labs-sgron and Ma-gcic Zha-ma: A Case of Mis­taken Iden­tity”, 6th Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Fagemes, Nor­way (21st — 28th August, 1992)
  • 11 Grande Stupa di Gyantse”, with­in the Tibetan Cul­tur­al Week organ­ized by “Art Res­tor­a­tion for Cul­tur­al Her­it­age”, Lugano (Villa Favor­ita, 16th Octo­ber, 1993).
  • Art styles as viewed by Padma-dkar-po”, in “Towards a Defin­i­tion of Style: The Arts of Tibet”, a con­fer­ence organ­ized by the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don) at the Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum, Lon­don (16th June, 1994).
  • The Sac­red Enclave of Gyantse: Its His­tory and Art”, as part of a series of lec­tures on Tibetan cul­ture organ­ized by the Deutsch-Tibet­is­che Kul­turgesell­schaft at the Uni­versitätsclub, Kon­vikt­strasse 9, Bonn (13th Novem­ber, 1994).
  • The Great Stupa of Gyantse. The Princes of Gyantse and their role as build­ers and pat­rons of art”, Sem­in­ar fur Sprach- und Kul­tur­wis­senschaft Zen­t­ralasi­ens, Uni­ver­sity of Bonn (14th Novem­ber, 1994).
  • Mer­­­cury-gild­ing in tra­di­tion­al Him­alay­an sculp­ture”, 7th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Schloss Seg­gau, Leib­n­itz (Graz) (22nd June, 1995).
  • Tra­di­tion­al Tibetan Paint­ing after 1959, with Spe­cial Ref­er­ence to Tshe-ring-dbang-‘dus” (read by Dr. Frank Korom), in Tibetan Cul­ture in Exile, a sym­posi­um hos­ted by the Inter­na­tion­al Folk Art Found­a­tion and the Museum of Inter­na­tion­al Folk Art, Sol y Som­bra, Santa Fe (5th-6th Octo­ber, 1995).
  • Il Grande Stupa di Gyantse. Sim­bol­ismo di un monu­mento reli­gioso tibetano del XV secolo”, lec­tur­ing tour organ­ized by Asso­ciazione Cul­turale Itali­ana: Tur­in (Teatro Alfieri, 15th Decem­ber, 1995), Florence (Palazzo Borghese, 16th Decem­ber, 1995), Mil­ano (Teatro Stu­dio, 18th Decem­ber, 1995), Rome (Teatro Eliseo, 19th Decem­ber, 1995) and Bari (Teatro Esedra, 20th Decem­ber, 1995).
  • L’ar­chitettura sac­ra nel mondo indot­ibetano: la sim­bolo­gia dello stupa”, in Alleg­or­ia e arte nella cul­tura asi­at­ica, a series of lec­tures organ­ized by CeS­MEO (Isti­tuto Intem­azionale di Studi Asi­atici Avan­zati), 10th Aprii — 8th May 1996, Torino (Sala Con­ve­gni dell’isti­tuto Ban­cario San Paolo, 24th May 1996).
  • Il sim­bol­ismo del Grande Stupa di Gyantse e l’im­port­anza del suo ruolo nel manteni­mento dell’iden­tità stor­ica, reli­giosa e cul­turale del Tibet”, in Tibet: dall’oc­cu­pazione ad oggi. Una civiltà in peri­colo, 1st inter­na­tion­al meet­ing organ­ized by the Uni­ver­sity of Trieste, Gor­iz­ia (Aula Magna del Polo Uni­versit­ario di Gor­iz­ia, 21st June, 1996).
  • Artist­ic con­tacts and exchanges between China and Tibet from the 11th to the 15th cen­tury”, at the inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar Aspetti della trad­iz­ione reli­giosa tibetana e con­t­atti con aree cul­tur­ali attigue (“Incon­tri ori­ent­al­ist­ici 1999”), organ­ized by Isti­tuto “Venezia e l’Ori­ente”, Gior­gio Cini Found­a­tion, Venice (Isola di San Gior­gio Mag­giore, 18th Octo­ber 1999).
  • La pit­tura murale tibetana: i dip­inti dei mon­as­teri di Gonk­ar, Scialò, Gyantse”, in Arte in Tibet: con­o­scere, inter­venire, con­ser­vare, inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar organ­ized by Min­is­tero per i Beni e le Attiv­ità Cul­tur­ali, Rome (Church of Santa Marta, 28th March 2000).
  • La Valle del Nepal. Un esem­pio di con­ser­vazione, coes­istenza e tras­mis­sione di cul­ture diverse nelle Prealpi Him­alay­ane”, at the mani­fest­a­tion Transcul­ture, organ­ized by the Coun­cil of Bel­luno and the Asso­ciazione Itali­ana Cul­tura Sport, Bel­luno (Palazzo Crep­adona — Aud­it­or­i­um, 6th May 2000).
  • The holy art from Tibet: icon­o­graphy, sym­bol­ism and tech­niques”, Found­a­tion “la Caixa”, Girona (Aud­it­or­i­um Nar­cis de Car­reras, 24th Octo­ber 2000).
  • Varna’s judge­ment in the Bar do thos grok an early Tibetan mys­tery play”, at the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence L’op­era tibetana — un teatro vivente”, organ­ized by Isti­tuto “Venezia e l’Ori­ente”, Gior­gio Cini Found­a­tion, Venice (Isola di San Gior­gio Mag­giore, 7th May 2001).
  • Il Segno d’Ori­ente. Il sim­bol­ismo dello stupa con par­ti­c­ol­are rifer­i­mento al Kum­bum di Gyantse”, at the inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar il Segno, organ­ized by “Il Punto”, Bari (Aula Magna, Uni­ver­sity of Bari, 27th Octo­ber 2001).
  • Il sim­bol­ismo dello stüpa, con par­ti­c­ol­are rifer­i­mento al sKu ’bum di Gyantse”, organ­ized by the Buddhist Stud­ies Group of the Depart­ment of Asi­at­ic Stud­ies at Isti­tuto Uni­versit­ario Ori­entale, Naples (Lib­rary of the Depart­ment of Asi­at­ic Stud­ies, Palazzo Corigli­ano, 16th Janu­ary 2002).
  • The Spir­it of Tibetan Art: An Intro­duc­tion”, at the sym­posi­um organ­ized on the occa­sion of the open­ing of the exhib­i­tion “Him­alay­as. An Aes­thet­ic Adven­ture” in the ses­sion “Aes­thet­ic Prin­ciples and The­or­ies” chaired by Pra­tapaditya Pal, Chica­go (The Art Insti­tute, 4th April 2003).
  • Tra­di­tion­al Buddhist Art in 20th Cen­tury Ladakh”, 11th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (hos­ted by the Jam­mu and Kash­mir Academy of Art, Cul­ture and Lan­guages, Leh, 21st July 2003).
  • Guru IHa-khang. A little-stud­ied temple at Phyi-dbang, cent­ral Ladakh”, 10th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies (Oxford, 10th Septem­ber 2003).
  • Tibetan Wall Paint­ing. Prob­lems of res­tor­a­tion in Lhasa and bey­ond”, Lhasa Con­ser­va­tion Work­shop 2003 organ­ized by the Tibet-Nor­way Uni­ver­sity Net­work, and hos­ted by the Arts Depart­ment and the Engin­eer­ing Col­lege of Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa, 14th Octo­ber 2003).
  • The Mon­gols and Tibet. A His­tor­ic­al Intro­duc­tion”, at the sym­posi­um “Power, Wealth and Art. The Mon­gol Pat­ron­age of Tibetan Cul­ture” organ­ized by the Circle of Tibetan and Him­alay­an Stud­ies at the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies (Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don, 8th Novem­ber 2003).
  • 11 Grande Stupa di Gyantze” with­in the cul­tur­al event “Tibet. Una Porta verso Ori­ente” organ­ized by “Ori­entalia Bugel­lae” — Isti­tuto Biellese per l’Oriente (Biella, Museo del Ter­ritorio, 23rd Janu­ary 2004).
  • Prob­lems of Con­ser­va­tion of Mur­als in Tibetan Temples”, at the 2nd Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tibetan Archae­ology and Arts (Beijing, China Tibet­o­logy Research Cen­ter, 5th Septem­ber 2004) and at the Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tra­di­tion­al Archi­tec­ture and Mur­als Con­ser­va­tion, organ­ized by the Tibet Uni­ver­sity in Lhasa and the Tibet-Nor­way Uni­ver­sity Net­work, and hos­ted by the Arts Depart­ment and Engin­eer­ing Col­lege of Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa, 24th Septem­ber 2004).
  • Ruolo e icon­o­grafia dei monti sac­ri nella cul­tura tibetana”, at the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Reli­gioni e Sac­ri Monti”, organ­ized by the Pied­mont Region and by the Uni­ver­sity of Tur­in (Mon­calvo, 14th Octo­ber 2004).
  • Il con­trib­uto di Fosco Marami alla con­o­scenza della cul­tura tibetana nel primo Nove­cento”, at the gath­er­ing on “Viaggia­tori italiani in Tibet”, organ­ized by the Gabin­etto Sci­en­ti­fico Let­ter­ario “G. P. Vieus­seux” and Soci­età di Studi Geo­gra­fici in Firen­ze (Florence, 18th Janu­ary 2005).
  • Buddhismo, islam e cris­ti­anes­imo sul Tetto del Mondo”, Centro Cul­turale Italo-Ara­bo “Dar Al Hikma” (Tur­in, 17th May 2005).
  • A 16th-cen­tury Ladakhi School of Paint­ing”, 12th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (Kar­gil, 13st July 2005).
  • L’arte buddhista in India”, as part of the course “Con­o­scere l’Asia: l’india”, Uni­versità Aperta “Giuli­etta Mas­ina e Fed­erico Fellini” (Rimini, 10th March 2006).
  • Two For­got­ten Chapels in the Naga Temple Behind the Potala, 11th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies (König­swinter, 1st Septem­ber 2006).
  • Chinese Influ­ence in A Wall Paint­ing at Zhwa lu and the Latter’s Polit­ic­al Mean­ing”, at the 3rd Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tibetan Archae­ology and Arts (Beijing, Cap­it­al Nor­mal Uni­ver­sity, 15th Octo­ber 2006).
  • Prob­lems of Con­ser­va­tion and Appre­ci­ation of Tibetan Mur­als”, at the sem­in­ar “Mur­al Paint­ing Con­ser­va­tion” organ­ized by ASIA (Asso­ci­ation for Inter­na­tion­al Solid­ar­ity in Asia) in Rome (Isti­tuto Cent­rale per il Res­tauro, 22nd June 2007).
  • Notes on sky-bur­i­al in Indi­an Tibet”, 13th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies (Rome, 7th Septem­ber 2007).
  • The Snake Temple Behind the Potala. Prob­lems of Con­ser­va­tion”, at the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Cul­tur­al Her­it­age and Sus­tain­able Devel­op­ment of His­tor­ic Cit­ies in Asia: Safe­guard­ing tra­di­tions and ancient know­ledge to pro­mote devel­op­ment” organ­ized by ASIA (Asso­ci­ation for Inter­na­tion­al Solid­ar­ity in Asia) in Ber­lin (Hum­boldt Uni­ver­sity, Sen­at­saal, 5th Decem­ber 2007).
  • Segreto Tibet e Fosco Marami”, at the present­a­tion of Fosco Mara­m­i’s Pel­legrino in Asia. Opere scelte organ­ized by the Centro Romantico of Gabin­etto Sci­en­ti­fico Let­ter­ario “G. P. Vieus­seux” — “Vieus­seux Asia” (Florence, 11th Decem­ber 2007).
  • Ippolito Desid­er­i’s remarks on Tibetan Archi­tec­ture”, read by Robert Pompimi at the pan­el on Ippolito Desid­eri, Fif­teenth Con­gress of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation of Buddhist Stud­ies, Emory Uni­ver­sity in Atlanta, Geor­gia (June 23–29, 2008).
  • Con­tem­por­ary reli­gious paint­ing in geo-cul­tur­al Tibet”, at the inter­na­tion­al sem­in­ar “From Thang­kas to Poke­mon Buddha. A Jour­ney through Tibetan Paint­ing” organ­ized by ASIA (Asso­ci­ation for Inter­na­tion­al Solid­ar­ity in Asia) in Naples (Uni­versità degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, 3rd March 2009).
  • Newar Influ­ence at Gyantse”, at the inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence “Tra­di­tion­al Set­tle­ments and Hous­ing in Tibet Autonom­ous Region (TAR), China and Nepal” organ­ized by THUNDER in cooper­a­tion with Tibet Uni­ver­sity (Lhasa), Trib­huvan Uni­ver­sity (Kath­mandu) and the Nor­we­gi­an Uni­ver­sity of Sci­ence and Tech­no­logy (Trond­heim) at Lal­it­pm (Godav­ari Vil­lage Resort, 26th Octo­ber 2009).
  • Dis­eg­nare il volto del Buddha”, work­shop at Acca­demia delle Belle Arti, Bologna (22nd March 2010).
  • L’influenza artist­ica newar in Tibet fra VII e XV secolo”, at the sem­in­ar “Arte Tibetana tra pas­sato e presente”, Dipar­ti­mento di Studi Ori­ent­ali of “Sapi­enza”, Uni­ver­sity of Rome (3rd Novem­ber 2010)
  • Newar Artist­ic Influ­ence in Tibet accord­ing to Tibetan His­tor­ic­al Som­ces”, Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, 23rd May 2011.
  • The Mahäbodhi image in the gtsug-lag-khang at rGy­al-rtse” at the col­loqui­um “Poli­tique et reli­gions en Him­alaya et Asie Cent­rale. L’expression poli­tique et reli­gieuse de la souveraineté en Him­alaya et en Asie Cent­rale: rituels, textes, rep­res­ent­a­tions, insti­tu­tions, de l’antiquité à nos )oms”, Museo Nazionale d’Arte Ori­entale, Rome, 11th Octo­ber 2011.
  • Mes­sage on the role played by tan­tric Hinduism and Buddhism on the paint­er Charles Rol­li­er at the open­ing of an exhib­i­tion of works by the artist at the Foy­er Point Favre, Chene-Bomg, Switzer­land (27th Septem­ber 2012).
  • Arte buddhista tibetana e him­alay­ana attra­verso il tempo”, Aud­itor­io dell’università della Svizzera itali­ana, Lugano, 15th Aprii 2014 (for the cycle “L’arte del Tibet” organ­ized by the Museo delle Cul­ture di Lugano on behalf of Soci­età Ticinese di Belle Arti with the col­lab­or­a­tion of the Museo Nazionale d’ Arte Ori­entale “Giuseppe Tucci”, Rome), and Florence, 25th Octo­ber 2014 (on the occa­sion of the open­ing of the sale-exhib­i­­tion “Di spirito e metallo. Arti, forme e colori del mondo him­alay­ano” and of the present­a­tion of the book Imma­gini di fede nel mondo tibetano e him­alay­ano, fiorence num­ber nine, Firenze).

 

ORGANIZATION OF CONFERENCES:

11 Tibet fra mito e realtà. Con­ve­gno per il cen­ten­ario della nas­cita di Fosco Maraini”, Gabin­etto “G. P. Vieus­seux”, Palazzo Medici-Ric­­cardi and Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, 14th March 2012.

Books, Catalogues and Editorships:

1) sKu-thang. Pit­ture tibetane dal quin­dices­imo al ventes­imo secolo, and sKu-thang. Tibetan Paint­ings from the Fif­teenth to the Twen­ti­eth Cen­tury, Mario Luca Giusti, Firen­ze 1983, XXVIII109 pp.

2) (with F. Ricca) Gyantse Revis­ited, Le Lettere, Firen­ze, 1990, xiii-569 pp.

3) Tibet: dimora degli dei. Arte buddhista tibetana e him­alay­ana dal XII al XX secolo, La Rinas­cente, Mil­ano, 1991, 124 pp.

4) Tsàn-yan-ghia-tsò, VI Dalai Lama: Canti d’amore, Sellerio, Palermo, 1993, 133 pp.

5) Vita e canti del VI Dalai Lama, L’Angolo Man­zoni, Torino, 1993, xiv-143 pp.

6) (with F. Ricca) The Great Stupa of Gyantse. A Com­plete Tibetan Pan­theon of the Fif­teenth Cen­tury, Ser­in­dia, Lon­don, 1993, 319 pp.

7) Le Montagne Sac­re. Anti­ca Arte del Tibet, Museo d’Arte Medi­ev­ale e Mod­erna Mod­ena, 1994, 35 pp.

8) Tesori del Tibet: oggetti d’arte dai mon­as­teri di Lhasa, La Rinas­cente, Mil­ano, 1994, 173 pp.

9) La preziosa ghir­landa degli inseg­na­menti degli uccelli [Bya chos rin-chen ‘phreng-ba], Adelphi, Mil­ano, 1998, 108 pp.

10) A Tibetan Jour­ney. Dip­inti dal Tibet XIII-XIX secolo, Emil Mirza­kh­anian, Mil­ano, 1998, 77 pp.

11) Tibet. Tem­pli scom­parsi foto­gra­fati da Fosco Maraini, Ananke, Torino, 1998, 127 pp. 12) L’Amante Divino. Il culto di Krishna nella pit­tura del Rajasthan, Emil Mirza­kh­anian, Mil­ano, 2000, 46 pp.

13) Art of Tibet, Renzo Fres­chi, Mil­ano, 2001, 80 pp.

14) (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial double issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVI/3–4 (autumn-winter 2001), 236 pp.

15) (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial double issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVII/1–2 (2002), 275 pp.

16) (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial double issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVII/3–4 (2002), 214 pp. (with a ded­ic­a­tion by the dir­ect­or of the Lib­rary of Tibetan Works and Archives to the editor)

17) (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial double issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVIII/1–2 (2003), 220 pp.

18) India, Gre­cia dell’Asia. Tesori d’arte del sub­con­tin­ente indi­ano dal III mil­len­nio a. C. al XIX sec. d. C., Mar­co­v­aldo, Cuneo, 2003, 153 pp.

19) (ed.), Won­ders of Lo. The Artist­ic Her­it­age of Mus­tang, Marg, Mum­bai 2010, 164 pp.

20) (ed.), Images of Devo­tion. Reli­gious Sculp­ture from Nepal, Tibet and India, Capri­aquar & Stu­dio Nodo, Pes­cara – Como 2011, 95 pp.

21) (ed. with Chris­ti­an Luczan­its), Tibetan Art and Archi­tec­ture in Con­text. Pro­ceed­ings of the Elev­enth Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, König­swinter 2006, Inter­na­tion­al Insti­tute for Tibetan and Buddhist Stud­ies GmbH, Andi­ast 2010, xiii-406 pp.

22) (ed.), Art in Tibet. Issues in Tra­di­tion­al Tibetan Art from the Sev­enth to the Twen­ti­eth Cen­tury. Pro­ceed­ings of the Tenth Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Oxford, 2003, vol. 10/13, Brill, Leiden – Boston 2011, 336 pp.

23) Gods and Demons of the Himâlay­as, Rossi & Rossi, Lon­don 2012, 83 pp.

24) (ed.), Il Tibet fra mito e realtà — Tibet between Myth and Real­ity. Atti del con­ve­gno per il cen­ten­ario della nas­cita di Fosco Maraini, Leo S. Olsch­ki, Firen­ze 2014, 139 pp.

25) (ed. with John Bray), Art and Archi­tec­ture in Ladakh. Cross-Cul­tur­al Trans­mis­sions in the Him­alay­as and Karakoram, Brill, Leiden – Boston 2014, 438 pp.

26) Imma­gini di fede nel mondo tibetano e him­alay­ano, florence num­ber nine, Firen­ze 2014, 79 pp.

 

Articles and Essays:

1) “Buddhist Him­alay­an Art in the XXth Cen­tury”, Him­alay­an Cul­ture, I/1 (Octo­ber 1978), pp. 19–35.

2) “La saga di Gesar di Ling: ris­poste mitopoi­etiche con­tin­ue a istanza epica “, in G. Morelli (ed.), Mit­o­lo­gie, Venezia, 1979, pp. 161–65.

3) “Him­alay­an Sac­red Art in the 20th Cen­tury”, Art Inter­na­tion­al, XXIV/5–6 (Janu­ary-Feb­ru­ary 1981), pp. 114–28.

4) “The Use of Offi­cin­al Plants among the Lama People of Yol-mo”, Kailash, VIII/1–2 (1981), pp. 89–108.

5) “Statu­ary Metals in Tibet and the Him­alay­as”, in Wil­li­am Oddy & Wladi­mir Zwalf (eds), Aspects of Tibetan Metal­lurgy, spe­cial issue of Brit­ish Museum Occa­sion­al Papers, 15 (1981), pp. 33–67, and Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy, 1–3 (1991), pp. 7–41.

6) “Cast­ing of Devo­tion­al Images in the Him­alay­as”, Brit­ish Museum Occa­sion­al Papers, 15 (1981), pp. 69–86, and Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy, 1–3 (1991), pp. 43–75.

7) “Tibet e Cina”, Cal­en­dario del Popolo, XXXVIII/441 (Feb­ru­ary 1982), pp. 8543–47.

8) “Tibet”, in R. Cav­endish (ed.), Legends of the World, Lon­don 1982, pp. 38–44.

9) “Tra­di­tion­al Tibetan Paint­ing in Ladakh in the 20th Cen­tury”, Inter­na­tion­al Folk­lore Review, III (1983), pp. 52–72.

10) “Su alcuni fram­menti di testi tibetani con­ser­vati alla Bib­li­oteca dell’Ac­ca­demia delle Sci­en­ze di Torino”, Atti dell’Ac­ca­demia delle Sci­en­ze di Torino, CXVII (1983), pp. 53–54.

11) “L’in­flu­ence du bouddhisme et des arts indi­en et chinois sur la pein­ture de Charles Rol­li­er”, in Charles Rol­li­er. Les deux phases car­dinales, Pein­tures 1955–1968, Lausanne, 1984, 10 pp. “Der Ein­fluss der Buddhis­mus und der indis­chen und chin­es­is­chen Kunst auf die Malerei Charles Rol­li­ers” (Ger­man ver­sion of the pre­vi­ous art­icle), Heraus­gegeben vom Aar­gauer Kun­sthaus, Aarau 1985, (pp. 1–7).

12) “The Newar Artists of the Nepal Val­ley. An his­tor­ic­al account of their activ­it­ies in neigh­bour­ing areas with par­tic­u­lar ref­er­ence to Tibet”, Ori­ent­al Art, XXXI/3 (autumn 1985), (pp.17

13) “The Artists of the Nepal Val­ley”, Ori­ent­al Art, XXXI/4 (winter 1985–1986), pp. 409–20.

14) “The Dharmamaˆ∂ala-sËtra by Buddhag­uhya”, in G. Gnoli and L. Lan­ci­otti (eds), Ori­entalia Iosephi Tucci Memori­ae Dicata, Roma, 1987, pp. 787–818.

15) “Cul­tur­al Exchange and Social Inter­ac­tion between Tibetans and Newars from the Sev­enth to the Twen­ti­eth Cen­tury”, Inter­na­tion­al Folk­lore Review, VI (1988), pp. 86–114.

16) “Icon­o­graph­ic Sources and Icon­o­met­ric Lit­er­at­ure in Tibetan and Him­alay­an Art”, in Tadeusz Skorupski (ed.), Indo-Tibetan Stud­ies, Tring, 1990, pp. 171–97.

17) “The Princes of Gyantse and Their Role as Build­ers and Pat­rons of Art”, in Sh. Ihara and Z. Yamagu­chi (eds), Tibetan Stud­ies. Pro­ceed­ings of the 5th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Nar­ita, 1992, vol. 2, pp. 559–73.

18) “Ma-gcig Labs-sgron and Ma-gcig Zha-ma: A Case of Mis­taken Iden­tity”, in P. Kvaerne (ed.), Pro­ceed­ings of the 6th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies. Fagernes 1992, The Insti­tute for Com­par­at­ive Research in Human Cul­ture, Oslo, 1994, pp. 481–90.

19) “Per­corso tibetano”, Asia, 3 (1994), pp. 62–69.

20) “Tibetan Lit­er­at­ure on Art”, in J. Cabezón & R. Jack­son (eds), Tibetan Lit­er­at­ure. Stud­ies in Genre, North­field, 1996, pp. 470–84.

21) “The Sac­red Enclave of Gyantse”, in P. Pal (ed.), On the Path to Void. Buddhist Art of the Tibetan Realm, Mum­bai, 1996, pp. 122–41; and in Marg, XLVII/4 (June 1996), pp. 38–57.

22–46) “Agio­grafia tibetana”, “Ancient Nepal”, “Centre d’études him­alay­ennes”, “Con­cezione reli­giosa della stor­ia in Tibet”, “Cronachist­ica tibetana”, “Fonti tibetane”, “Gene­a­lo­gie tibetane”, “Guide tibetane mon­ast­iche e di pel­legrin­ag­gio”, “Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies”, “Journ­al of the Tibet Soci­ety, The”, “Lévi, S., Le Népal”, “Lib­rary of Tibetan Works and Archives”, “Locke, J., Buddhist Mon­as­ter­ies of Nepal”, “Nepal”, “Nepal Research Centre”, “Petech, Luciano”, “Reale/immaginario in Tibet”, “Richard­son, Hugh”, “Stor­ie eccle­si­ast­iche tibetane”, “Tibet”, “Tibet centro del mondo”, “Tibet Journ­al, The”, “Tibetan Academy of Social Sci­ences”, “Tucci, G., Tibetan Painted Scrolls”, “Vostrikov, Andrei Ivan­ovich”, in A. De Bern­ardi & S. Guar­ra­cino (eds), Diz­ion­ario di stori­ografia, Mil­ano, 1996, pp. 15, 41, 181, 233, 278, 416, 439–40, 497, 552, 575, 606, 612–13, 620, 740–41, 791, 852, 874, 1038, 1067–68, 1080 and 1107.

47–62) “Bodh­nath”; “Buddhism: Nepal”; “Bud­h­anilkanta”; “Changu Naray­an”; “Dhum­varahi”; “Museums. Col­lec­tions Out­side Nepal”; “Nepal. Museums. Museums in Nepal”; “Nepal: Paint­ing, Tra­di­tion­al paint­ing, Painted scrolls. Styl­ist­ic devel­op­ments C. 17th-19th cen­tur­ies. (i) Tibetan influ­ence”; “Nepal: Paint­ing, Tra­di­tion­al paint­ing, Painted scrolls. Styl­ist­ic devel­op­ments C. 17th19th cen­tur­ies. (ii) Influ­ence of Indi­an mini­atures”; “Nepal: Paint­ing, Tra­di­tion­al paint­ing, Painted scrolls. 19th and 20th cen­tur­ies”; “Panauti”; “Pashupat­inatha”; “Pharp­ing”; “Sankhu”; “Stupa. Nepal and Tibet”, “Svayamb­hunatha”; in J. Shoaf Turn­er (ed.), The Dic­tion­ary of Art, Lon­don, 1996, vol. 4, p. 213; vol. 5, pp. 102–103 and 121; vol. 6, pp. 448–49; vol. 8, pp. 795–96 and 849; vol. 22, pp. 785–87; vol. 23, p. 907; vol. 24, pp. 226 and 592; vol. 27, p. 755; vol. 29, pp. 867–68; and vol. 30, p. 53.

63) “Tibet, una colo­nia cinese alle soglie del Duem­ila” (I), Riforma, IV/49 (20 th Decem­ber 1996), p. 12.

64) “Tibet, una colo­nia cinese alle soglie del Duem­ila” (II), Riforma, IV/50 (27 th Decem­ber 1996), p. 8.

65) “Sculp­tur­al Styles Accord­ing to Pema Karpo”, in J. Casey Sing­er and P. Den­wood (eds), Tibetan Art. Towards a defin­i­tion of style, Lon­don, 1997, pp. 242–53 and 302–304.

66) “Mer­­­cury-gild­ing in Tra­di­tion­al Him­alay­an and Tibetan Sculp­ture”, in H. Krass­er, M. Tor­sten Much, E. Steinkell­ner, H. Tauscher (eds), Tibetan Stud­ies. Pro­ceed­ings of the 7th Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Wien, 1997, vol. II, pp. 573–82.

67) “The role of Newar schol­ars in trans­mit­ting the Indi­an Buddhist her­it­age to Tibet (c. 750 — c. 1200)”, in S. Karmay and Ph. Sag­ant (eds), Les hab­it­ants du Toit du monde. Études recueil­lies en hom­mage à Alex­an­der W. Mac­don­ald, Nan­terre, 1997, pp. 629–58.

68) “Érudits, artistes et fêtes de Lhasa”, in F. Pom­maret (ed.), Lhasa, lieu du divin, Genève, 1997, pp. 217–34; revised ver­sion: “Schol­ars, Artists and Feasts”, in F. Pom­maret (ed.), Lhasa in the Sev­en­teenth Cen­tury. The Cap­it­al of the Dalai Lamas, Leiden-Boston, 2003, pp. 179–98.

69) “The role of the schol­ars of the Nepal Val­ley in the trans­mis­sion of the Indi­an Buddhist her­it­age to Tibet with par­tic­u­lar ref­er­ence to the 13th and 14 cen­tur­ies”, in R. Arena, M. P. Bologna, M. L. May­er Mod­ena & A. Passi (eds), Bandhu. Scritti in onore di Carlo della Casa, Aless­andria, 1997, pp. 191–205.

70) “I thang-ka”, Tibet. Oltre la leg­genda. Civiltà ed arte dal XII al XX secolo, by vari­ous authors, Mil­ano, 1998, pp. 95–153; and “Cata­logo sezione museale” in S. Bazzeato Deotto (ed.), Tibet. Arte e spir­itu­al­ità. Un con­trib­uto alla stor­ia dell’uomo, Mil­ano, 1999, pp. 119–76.

71) “Arqui­tec­tura reli­giosa tibetana: mon­as­teri­os, tem­plos y ermitas”, in R. Prats (ed.), Mon­as­teri­os y lamas del Tibet, Bar­celona, 2000, pp. 36–45.

72) “On Some Inscrip­tions in the Temples of the bum-pa of the Great Stupa at Gyantse”, East and West, 50/1–4, 2000, pp. 387–437.

73) “A Note on the Dic­tion­ar­ies Com­piled by Itali­an Mis­sion­ar­ies in Tibet”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXVI/2 (2001), pp. 88–92.

74) “Chinese Artist­ic Influ­ence in Tibet from the 11th to the 15th Cen­tury”, in A. Cadonna & E. Bian­chi (eds), Facets of Tibetan Reli­gious Tra­di­tion and Con­tacts with Neigh­bour­ing Cul­tur­al Areas , Leo Olsch­ki, Firen­ze, 2002”, pp. 179–201.

75) “Il sim­bol­ismo dello stupa, con par­ti­c­ol­are rifer­i­mento al ‘Kum­bum’ di Gyant­sé”, in M. Davy &A. Guar­ini (eds), Il Segno. Memor­ia e testi­mo­ni­anza, con espres­sioni d’arte in Ori­ente, Occi­dente e Africa, Il Punto, Bari, 2002, pp. 121–37.

76) “Newar Sculptors and Tibetan Pat­rons in the 20 th Cen­tury”, in E. Lo Bue (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVII/3–4 (autumn-winter 2002), pp. 121–70, partly reprin­ted in Shir­o­mani, Krod­hakala (ed.), Kalu Kumale (Sculptor of Wrath­ful Gods), Nepal Academy of Fine Arts, 2019.

77) “Shakyamuni” and “Man­dala of Nair­atma”, in R. Fres­chi (ed.), The Art Jour­ney of Marco Polo, Ori­ent­al Art, Mil­ano, 2003, pp. 25 and 32.

78) “Un Tibet cler­icale”, Riforma, XI/47 (5 th Decem­ber 2003), p. 1.

79) “La statu­ar­ia in metallo”, in F. Ricca (ed.), Arte buddhista tibetana: dei e demoni dell’Himalaya, Mondadori Electa, Mil­ano, 2004, pp. 96–101.

80) “Nepal Sculptors and Tibetan Pat­rons in the 20 th cen­tury: Man Jyoti Shakya and his Fam­ily”, in R J. Shakya (ed.), Nepal. A pro­file on Newar Sculptor’s Fam­ily & Lost Wax Cast­ing Tech­nique, Shakyamuni Art Con­cern, Lal­it­pur, 2005, pp. 7–11.

81) “, Works of Tra­di­tion­al Buddhist Artists in 20 th Cen­tury Ladakh. A Pre­lim­in­ary Account”, in J. Bray (ed.), Ladakhi His­tor­ies. Loc­al and Region­al Per­spect­ives, Brill, Leiden — Boston, 2005, pp. 353–78; new edi­tion, Lib­rary of Tibetan Works and Archives, Dharam­sala, 2011, pp. 20–29.

82) “The Sixth Dalai Lama Tsangy­ang Gyatso”, in M. Brauen (ed.), The Dalai Lamas. A Visu­al His­tory, Ser­in­dia, Chica­go, 2005, pp. 92–101, and “Der Sech­ste Dalai Lama Tshangy­ang Gyatso”, in M. Brauen (ed.), Die Dalai Lamas. Tibets Reink­arna­tion­en des Bod­hisat­tva Avalokiteßvara, Völkerkun­demu­seum der Uni­versität Zürich — Arnold­sche, Zürich and Stut­tgart, 2005, pp. 92–101.

83) “Yama’s judge­ment in the Bar do thos grol chen mo: An Ind­ic Mys­tery Play in Tibet”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXX/2 (sum­mer 2005), pp. 9–24.

84) “A Short Bio­graphy of a Con­tem­por­ary Buddhist Paint­er”, in M. Ahmed & C. Har­ris (eds), Ladakh. Cul­ture at the Cross­roads, spe­cial issue of Marg, 57/1 (Septem­ber 2005), Marg Pub­lic­a­tions, Mum­bai, 2005, pp. 94–103; reprin­ted in 2010.

85) Lo Bue, Erberto. 2005. “Lives and Works of Tra­di­tion­al Buddhist Artists in 20 th Cen­tury Ladakh. A Pre­lim­in­ary Account.” In John Bray (ed.). Ladakhi His­tor­ies. Loc­al and Region­al Per­spect­ives. Leiden – Boston: Brill, 353–378; new edi­tion, 2011. Dharam­sala: Lib­rary of Tibetan Works and Archives, 20–29.

86) “Ruolo e icon­o­grafia dei monti sac­ri nella cul­tura tibetana”, in A. Barbero & S. Piano (eds), Reli­gioni e Sac­ri Monti. Atti del Con­ve­gno internazionale, Torino, Mon­calvo, Casale Mon­fer­rato, 12–16 ottobre 2004, Centro di Doc­u­mentazione dei Sac­ri Monti, Cal­vari e Complessi devozion­ali europei, Ponzano Mon­fer­rato, 2006, pp. 263–70.

87) “Tibet­ische Malerei”, in Jeong-Hee Lee-Kalisch (ed.), Tibet. Klöster öffn­en ihre Schatzkam­mern, Kul­turstif­tung Ruhr — Hirmer Ver­lag, Essen and München, 2006, pp. 90–95.

88) “Prob­lems of Con­ser­va­tion of Mur­als in Tibetan Temples”, in Xie Jisheng, Shen Weirong and Liao Yang (eds), Stud­ies in Sino-Tibetan Buddhist Art. Pro­ceed­ings of the Second Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tibetan Archae­ology and Art, Beijing, Septem­ber 3–6, 2004, China Tibet­o­logy Pub­lish­ing House, Beijing, 2006, pp. 404–26.

89) “A 16th ‑Cen­tury Ladakhi School of Buddhist Paint­ing”, in Pra­tapaditya Pal (ed.), Buddhist Art. Form & Mean­ing, Marg pub­lic­a­tions, Mum­bay, 2007, pp. 102–115; repub­lished in an updated ver­sion under the title “A 16 th Cen­tury School of Ladakhi Paint­ing”, in Mon­isha Ahmed & John Bray (eds), Recent Research on Ladakh 2009. Papers from the 12th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies Kar­gil, Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies, Kar­gil – Leh, 2009, pp. 20–29.

90) “Schede critiche”, in Maria Luisa Mon­cas­soli Tibone (ed.), La scul­tura del Gand­hara: il mes­sag­gio greco nelle imma­gini d’Oriente, Ananke, Torino, 2007, pp. 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33 and 35.

91) “The Gu ru lha khang at Phyi dbang: a Mid-15 th Cen­tury Temple in Cent­ral Ladakh”, in Amy Heller & Giac­omella Orofino (eds), Dis­cov­er­ies in West­ern Tibet and the Him­alay­as. Essays on His­tory, Lit­er­at­ure, Archae­ology and Art. Pro­ceed­ings of the Tenth Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, Oxford, 2003, vol. 10/8, Brill, Leiden – Boston, 2007, pp. 175–96.

92) “Tra­di­tion­al Buddhist Art in 20 th Cen­tury Ladakh”, in John Bray & Ngawang Tser­ing Shak­spo (eds), Recent Research on Ladakh 2007, J & K Academy for Art Cul­ture & Lan­guages Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies, Leh, 2007, pp. 89–98.

93) “Il velo nel mondo asi­atico”, in Andrea Busto (ed.), Il Velo, CeSAC – Sil­vanaEd­it­or­iale, Cin­is­ello Bal­samo (Mil­ano), 2007, pp. 44–46.

94) “Prob­lems of Con­ser­va­tion and Appre­ci­ation of Tibetan Mur­al Paint­ing”, in Francesca De Fil­ippi (ed.), Res­tor­a­tion and Pro­tec­tion of Cul­tur­al Her­it­age in His­tor­ic­al Cit­ies of Asia: between mod­ern­ity and tra­di­tion, Politec­nico di Torino — ASIA Onlus, Roma, 2007, pp. 113–24.

95) “Chinese Influ­ence in Some Wall Paint­ings at Zhwa lu and Their Polit­ic­al Mean­ing with­in Their Cul­tur­al Con­text”, Gugong Bowuy­uan Yuankan (Palace Museum Journ­al), 5 [133] (2007), pp. 67–77 (in Chinese) and 151 (abstract in Eng­lish), and in Jisheng Xie, Wen­hua Luo and Anning Jing (eds), Stud­ies on Sino-Tibetan Buddhist Art. Pro­ceed­ings of the Third Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence of Tibetan Archae­ology and Art (Beijing, Cap­it­al Nor­mal Uni­ver­sity, Octo­ber 13–16, 2006), Guji Pub­lish­ing House, Shang­hai, 2009, pp. 213–222.

96) “Giuseppe Tucci and His­tor­ic­al Stud­ies on Tibetan Art”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXXII/1 (spring 2007), pp. 53–64.

97) “Il ginepraio tibetano: radice anti­ca della rivolta”, il mani­festo, XXXXVIII/70 (19 th March 2008), p. 11.

98) “Tibet e Cina: una tra­gica relazione”, Riforma, XVI/13 (28 th March 2008), p. 10.

99) “Tibet e Cina: le radici di una con­vivenza dif­fi­cile”, laicità, XX/2 (June 2008), p. 15.

100) “Shadak­shari Avalokiteshvara”, “Lama”, “Vir­upa”, “Akshob­hya”, “Vajrav­arahi”, “Parnashav­ari”, “Shas­tradhara Hevajra”, “The 9 th Karmapa”, “Vajra water knife”, in Anna Maria and Fabio Rossi (eds), Images of Faith. A Private Col­lec­tion of Him­alay­an Art, Rossi & Rossi, Lon­don, 2008, pp. 10–29, 32–33, 36–41 and 58–59.

101) “Alla scoperta degli evan­gelici del Nepal”, Riforma, XVI/40 (17 th Octo­ber 2008), p. 16.

102) “Islam e Cris­ti­anes­imo nel Tibet buddhista: il caso del Ladak”, in Daniele Ceven­ini & Svevo D’Onofrio (eds), ‘Uyûn al-Akh­bâr. Studi sul mondo islamico, il Ponte, Bologna 2008, pp. 193–217.

103) “Tibetan Aes­thet­ics versus West­ern Aes­thet­ics in the Appre­ci­ation of Reli­gious Art”, in Mon­ica Esposito (ed.), Images of Tibet in the 19 th and 20 th Cen­tur­ies, École française d’ExtrêmeOrient, Par­is 2008, vol. II, pp. 687–704.

104) “Con­tem­por­ary Reli­gious Paint­ing in Geo-Cul­tur­al Tibet”, in Valer­ia Donati & Mara Matta (eds), Tibetan Arts in Trans­ition. A Jour­ney through Theatre, Cinema and Paint­ing, ASIA Onlus, Roma 2009, pp. 97–104; trans­lated into Itali­an by Valer­ia Donati as “La pit­tura reli­giosa con­tem­por­anea nel Tibet geo-cul­turale” in Valer­ia Donati & Mara Matta (eds), Le arti tibetane in trans­iz­ione. Un viaggio attra­verso teatro, cinema e pit­tura, ASIA Onlus, Roma 2009, pp. 97–104.

105) “Notes on Sky-Bur­i­al in Indi­an, Chinese and Nepalese Tibet”, in John Bray & Elena De Rossi Filibeck (eds), Moun­tains, Mon­as­ter­ies and Mosques. Recent Research on Ladakh and the West­ern Him­alaya. Pro­ceed­ings of the 13 th Col­loqui­um of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Ladakh Stud­ies, sup­ple­ment No. 2 to Riv­ista degli Studi Ori­ent­ali, New Series, vol. LXXX, Fab­riz­io Serra Editore, Pisa – Roma, 2009, pp. 221–237.

106) “Con­sid­er­a­tions on the his­tor­ic­al and polit­ic­al con­text of the icon­o­graphy of three south­west­ern Tibetan temples”, in Jean-Luc Achard (ed.), Études tibé­taines en l’honneur d’Anne Chayet, Droz, Genève 2010, pp. 147–173.

107) “An Intro­duc­tion to the Cul­tur­al His­tory of Lo (Mus­tang)”, in Erberto Lo Bue (ed.), Won­ders of Lo. The Artist­ic Her­it­age of Mus­tang, Marg, Mum­bai 2010, pp. 10–23.

108) “Cave Her­mit­ages and Chapels in East­ern Lo”, in Erberto Lo Bue (ed.), Won­ders of Lo. The Artist­ic Her­it­age of Mus­tang, Marg, Mum­bai 2010, pp. 40–55.

109) “Won­ders of Möntang”, in Erberto Lo Bue (ed.), Won­ders of Lo. The Artist­ic Her­it­age of Mus­tang, Marg, Mum­bai 2010, Marg, Mum­bai 2010, pp. 76–89.

110) “Buddhist Art and Archi­tec­ture in Nepal.” In Oxford Bib­li­o­graph­ies in Buddhism. Ed. Richard Payne. New York: Oxford Uni­ver­sity Press, forthcoming.

111) “The Íambhala Mur­als in the Klu khang and Their His­tor­ic­al Con­text. A Pre­lim­in­ary Report”, in Erberto Lo Bue and Chris­ti­an Luczan­its (eds), Tibetan Art and Archi­tec­ture in Con­text. Pro­ceed­ings of the Elev­enth Sem­in­ar of the Inter­na­tion­al Asso­ci­ation for Tibetan Stud­ies, König­swinter 2006, Inter­na­tion­al Insti­tute for Tibetan and Buddhist Stud­ies GmbH, Andi­ast 2010, pp. 353–374.

112) “Stor­ia e ragioni di un’amicizia”, in Fosco Maraini, DREN-GIONG. Il primo libro di Fosco Maraini e i ricordi dei suoi amici (ed. by Mieko Maraini), Corbac­cio, Mil­ano 2012, pp. 161–176.

113) “Una pic­cola comunità prot­est­ante nel Tibet indi­ano”, Riforma, XXI/48 (20 dicembre 2013), p. 5.

114) “Newar Artist­ic Influ­ence in Tibet and China between the 7 th and the 15 th Cen­tury”, in Elena de Rossi Filibeck (ed.), Tibetan Art Between Past and Present: Stud­ies Ded­ic­ated to Luciano Petech. Pro­ceed­ings of the Con­fer­ence held in Rome on the 3 rd Novem­ber 2010”, sup­ple­ment No. 1 to Riv­ista di Studi Ori­ent­ali. Nuova Serie, LXXXIV, Fab­riz­io Serra, Pisa — Roma 2012, pp. 25–62. Earli­er ver­sion pub­lished in Sudar­shan Raj Tiwari, Guo Hong­wei and Hans Christie Bjoennes (eds), Con­fer­ence Papers. Inter­na­tion­al Con­fer­ence on Tra­di­tion­al Set­tle­ments and Hous­ing in Tibet Autonom­ous Region (TAR), China and Nepal. Insti­tute of Engin­eer­ing, Lal­it­pur, Nepal, 26, 27 and 28 Oto­ber 2009, Trans-Him­alay­an Uni­ver­sity Net­work for Edu­ca­tion and Research (THUNDER) Pro­ject – Insti­tute of Engin­eer­ing, Lal­it­pur [2013], pp. 25–50.

115) “Shâkyamuni”, “Vajrad­hâtu màn­dala” and “Shâkyamuni’s mir­acles”, in Eti Bonn-Muller (ed.), Clas­sic­al Selec­tion 2014 – Stand 166 – TEFAF Maastricht, Rossi & Rossi 2014, pp. 24–25, 30–31 and 48–49.

116) “Intro­duc­tion” in Erberto Lo Bue (ed.), Il Tibet fra mito e realtà — Tibet between Myth and Real­ity, Leo S. Olsch­ki, Firen­ze 2014, pp. 1–32.

117) “The Paint­ing of Charles Rol­li­er: The Influ­ence of Indi­an Cul­ture on a European Artist”, Mårg. A Magazine of the Arts, 65/3 (March 2014), pp. 14–27.

118) (with John Bray) “Intro­duc­tion” in Erberto Lo Bue & John Bray (eds), Art and Archi­tec­ture in Ladakh. Cross-Cul­tur­al Trans­mis­sions in the Him­alay­as and Karakoram, Brill, Leiden – Boston 2014, pp. 1–14.

119) “Tibet. Un buddhismo non sempre paci­fico”, Riforma, XXII/19 (16 th May 2014), p. 5.

120) “In memory of Vit­torio Chi­audano (1935–1996): 20th-cen­tury Buddhist and Hindu statues from the Nepal Val­ley belong­ing to the Aniko Col­lec­tion on loan to the Vic­tor­ia and Albert Museum”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXXIX/2 (autumn-winter 2014), pp. 3–35.

121) “Nepàl Màn­dala. È uno spazio sac­ro. Unico al mondo” [Ori­gin­al title: “Nepàl Màn­dala. Uno spazio sac­ro unico al mondo”], Il Giornale dell’arte, XXXIII/354 (June 2015), pp. 6–7.

122) “Giuseppe Tuc­ci’s Remarks on the State of Pre­ser­va­tion of Tibetan Monu­ments in the 1930s and 1940s”, Octo­ber 2015, http://asianart.com/articles/lobue/index.html (pdf in http://asianart.com/articles/lobue/lobue.pdf)

123) “A zhabs-brtan Cere­mony Per­formed in a rNy­ing-ma House­hold at Jawalakhel, Lal­it­pur, Nepal (1986)”, in Hanna Havnekik and Charles Ramble (eds), From Bhakti to Bon. Fest­s­chrift for Per Kvaerne, The Insti­tute for Com­par­at­ive Research in Human Cul­ture – Novus Press, Oslo 2015, pp. 325–336.

124) “Con­sid­er­a­tions on the Gtsug lag khang in the Dpal ’khor chos sde of Rgy­al rtse”, in Olaf Czaja and Gun­tram Hazod (eds), The Illu­min­at­ing Mir­ror. Tibetan Stud­ies in Hon­our of Per K. Sørensen on the Occa­sion of his 65th Birth­day, Dr. Lud­wig Reich­ert Ver­lag, Wies­baden 2015, pp. 283–302 and 596–600.

125) “Ippolito Desideri’s remarks on Tibetan Archi­tec­ture”, in Pier­francesco Fedi and Maur­iz­io Pao­lillo (eds), Arte dal Medi­ter­raneo al Mar della Cina. Gen­esi ed incon­tri di scuole e stili. Scritti in onore di Paola Mor­tari Ver­gara Caf­farelli, Offi­cina di Studi Medi­ev­ali, Palermo 2015, pp. 299–310.

126) “Il Tibet e Lorenzo Aless­andri”, in Con­cetta Leto (ed.), Il Tibet di Aless­andri, Fondazione Ottavio Mazzo­nis, Torino 2016, pp. 22–37.

127) “The Con­di­tion of Tibetan Mon­as­ter­ies in the 1930s and ’40s as Recor­ded by Giuseppe Tucci”, Marg. A Magazine of the Arts, 67/3 (March-June 2016), pp. 66–75.

128) Inter­pret­a­tion of a Tibetan inscrip­tion on a Buddhist statue in Ilaria Bel­lucci (ed., in col­lab­or­a­tion with Jac­opo Pan­dolfini), Asi­an Art – Chinese, Islam­ic and Indi­an Works of Art, Casa d’Aste Cap­it­oli­umart, Bescia 2016, p. 131, n. 294.

129) “A Tibetan Mahābodhi. The Main Image in the dPal ’khor chos sde of rGy­al rtse, in Elena de Rossi Filibeck, Michela Clem­ente, Gior­gio Mil­an­etti, Oscar Nales­ini, Fed­er­ica Ven­turi (eds), Stud­ies in Hon­our of Luciano Petech. A Com­mem­or­a­tion Volume, 1914–2014, sup­ple­ment No. 1 to Riv­ista degli Studi Ori­ent­ali, New Series, vol. LXXXIX, Fab­riz­io Serra Editore, Pisa – Roma, 2016, pp. 133–146 and 226–230.

130) “Tshe ring dngos grub, a Ladaki Paint­er and Astro­lo­ger”, The Tibet Journ­al, XLII/1 (spring­sum­mer 2017), pp. 3–12.

131) “The Dhar­marā­jas of Gyant­sé. Their Indi­an and Tibetan Mas­ters, and the Icon­o­graphy of the Main Assembly Hall in Their Vihāra”, in Alice Cris­anti, Cin­zia Pieruc­cini, Chiara Pol­i­cardi, Paola M. Rossi (eds), Anantar­at­naprabhava. Studi in onore di Giuli­ano Boc­cali, Uni­versità degli Studi di Milano–Dipartimento di Studi let­ter­ari, filo­lo­gici e lin­guist­ici, Led­iz­ioni (Con­son­an­ze, 11), Mil­ano 2017, vol. 2, pp. 341–360.

132) “Obit­u­ary: Dav­id Snellgrove 1920–2016”, Ladakh Stud­ies, 34 (July 2017), pp. 38–41; revised ver­sion: The Tibet Journ­al, XLIII/2 (Autumn/Winter 2018), “Obit­u­ary: Dav­id Llewellyn Snellgrove (29 June 1920 – 25 March 2016)”, pp. 89–93.

133) “Buddhist Art and Archi­tec­ture in Tibet”, Oxford Research Encyc­lo­pe­dia of Reli­gion, Feb.2018, DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780199340378.013.172, Oxford Uni­ver­sity Press USA 2016, 31 pp.

134) Lo Bue, Erberto, “Charles Rol­li­er: l’influsso della cul­tura indi­ana su un artista europeo” (revised Itali­an ver­sion of “The Paint­ing of Charles Rol­li­er: The Influ­ence of Indi­an Cul­ture on a European Artist”, Mårg. A Magazine of the Arts, 65/3, March 2014, pp. 14–27), Asso­ci­ation Charles Rol­li­er, Chêne- Bourg 2018, 12 pp. 138); and “Charles Rol­li­er: l’influence de la cul­ture indi­enne su un artiste européen” (revised French ver­sion of “The Paint­ing of Charles Rol­li­er: The Influ­ence of Indi­an Cul­ture on a European Artist”, Mårg. A Magazine of the Arts, 65/3, March 2014, pp. 14–27), Asso­ci­ation Charles Rol­li­er, Chêne-Bourg 2020, 12 pp.

135) “Numeri indi­ani o ‘arabi’?”, L’Eco delle Valli Valdesi, 11 (Novem­ber 2018), p. 15.

136) “Lettere dal Tibet”, Quaderni Asi­atici, 124 (Decem­ber 2018), pp. 25–49 and 91–94.

137) “Note in mar­gine all’archivio foto­grafico di Fosco Maraini”, in Michela Clem­ente, Oscar Nales­ini and Fed­er­ica Ven­turi (eds), Per­spect­ives on Tibetan Cul­ture — A Small Gar­land of For­­get-me-nots Offered to Elena De Rossi Filibeck, in Revue d’Et­udes Tibé­taines, 51 (July 2019), pp. 189–202.

 

Reviews and Review articles:

1) “Michael Aris and Aung San Suu Kyi (eds), Tibetan Stud­ies in Hon­our of Hugh Richard­son”, Reli­gious Stud­ies, XVII/14 (1981), pp. 580–84.

2) “Dav­id L. Snellgrove and Tadeusz Skorupski: The Cul­tur­al her­it­age of Ladakh, vol. II. Zang­s­kar and the cave temples of Ladakh. With part 4 on the inscrip­tions at Alchi by Philip Den­wood”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, XLV/1 (1982), pp. 208–10.

3) “Fernand Mey­er: gSo-ba rig-pa. Le sys­tème médic­al tibé­tain”, Arts Asi­atiques, XXXIX (1984), pp. 116–17.

4) “Dav­id P. Jack­son and Janice A. Jack­son: Tibetan Thangka Paint­ing, meth­ods and mater­i­als”, Arts Asi­atiques, XL (1985), pp. 138–39.

5) “Pra­tapaditya Pal: Art of Tibet: a cata­logue of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Col­lec­tion. With and appendix on inscrip­tions by H. E. Richard­son”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, XLIX/1 (1986), pp. 233–34.

6) “Wladi­mir Zwalf (ed.), Buddhism: art and faith”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, L/2 (1987), p. 393.

7) “Karel Wern­er (ed.): Sym­bols in art and reli­gion. The Indi­an and the com­par­at­ive per­spect­ives”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, LIV/3 (1991), pp. 598–99.

8) “Early temples of Cent­ral Tibet. By Roberto Vitali”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), II/1 (April 1992), pp. 125–28.

9) “The Ngor Man­dalas of Tibet. Plates. By bSod nams rgya mtsho and Musashi Tachi­kawa”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), II/2 (July 1992), pp. 313–14.

10) “Tibet: Civil­isa­tion et société. Col­loque organ­isé par la Fond­a­tion Sing­er-Polig­n­ac à Par­is, les 27, 28, 29 Avril 1987. Edited by F. Mey­er”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), II/2 (July 1992), pp. 315–18.

11) “Michael Aris [and] Patrick Booz: Lamas, princes, and brig­ands. Joseph Rock­’s pho­to­graphs of the Tibetan bor­der­lands of China. Con­tri­bu­tions by S. B. Sut­ton and Jef­frey Wag­n­er”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, LVII/3 (1994), pp. 619–20.

12) “Druma-kinnara-råja-parip®cchå-sËtra. A crit­ic­al edi­tion of the Tibetan text (Recen­sion A) based on eight edi­tions of the Kan­jur and the Dun­huang manu­script frag­ment. By Paul Har­ris­on”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 4/2 (July 1994), pp. 292–93.

13) (with Rolf W. Giebel) “A Crit­ic­al Edi­tion of the sGra sby­or bam po gnyis pa. An Old and Basic Com­ment­ary on the Mahåvy­ut­patti. Edited by Mie Ishi­kawa”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 4/3 (Novem­ber 1994), pp. 429–30.

14) “K∑emendra’s Bod­hisat­tvâvadånakalpal­atå. Stud­ies and Mater­i­als. By Marek Mejor”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 5/1 (April 1995), pp. 149–50.

15) “The Ngor Man­dalas of Tibet. List­ings of the Man­dala Deit­ies. By bSod-nams-rgya-mtsho”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 5/1 (April 1995), p. 148.

16) “The Cult of the Deity Vajrak¥la, Accord­ing to the Texts of the North­ern Treas­ures Tra­di­tion of Tibet (Byang-gter phur-ba). By Mar­tin Boord”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 5/2 (July 1995), pp. 320–23.

17) “Hugh Richard­son: Cere­mon­ies of the Lhasa Year. Edited by Michael Aris”, Bul­let­in of the School of Ori­ent­al and Afric­an Stud­ies, LVIII/3 (Octo­ber 1995), pp. 593–95.

18) “Bul­let­in of Tibet­o­logy: aspects of clas­sic­al Tibetan medi­cine, spe­cial volume of 1993, Gang­tok, Sikkim Research Insti­tute of Tibet­o­logy “, Med­ic­al His­tory, 39 (Octo­ber 1995), pp. 514–15.

19) “Per Sørensen, The Mir­ror Illu­min­at­ing the Roy­al Gene­a­lo­gies”, Asia, 6 (1995), p. 74.

20) “Dav­id Jack­son, A His­tory of Tibetan Paint­ing. The Great Tibetan Paint­ers and Their Tra­di­tions”, East and West, 47/1–4 (Decem­ber 1997), pp. 457–61.

21) “The Vajr­abhair­ava Tan­tras. Tibetan and Mon­go­li­an Ver­sions, Eng­lish Trans­la­tion and Annota­tions. By Bulc­su Siklós (ed.)”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 8/2 (July 1998), pp. 290–93.

22) “Ordre spirituel et ordre tem­porel dans la pensée bouddhique de l’Inde et du Tibet. Quatre con­férences au Collège de France. By Dav­id Sey­fort Ruegg”, Journ­al of the Roy­al Asi­at­ic Soci­ety (Third Series), 8/2 (July 1998), pp. 293–96.

23) “The Future Buddha Maitreya. An Icon­o­lo­gic­al Study by Inchang Kim”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXIII/3 (autumn 1998), pp. 123–27.

24) “Per K. Sørensen: Tibetan Buddhist His­tori­ography. The Mir­ror Illu­min­at­ing the Roy­al Gene­a­lo­gies”, Acta Ori­entalia, 59 (1998), pp. 308–13.

25) “The Arts and Crafts of the Swat Val­ley. Liv­ing Tra­di­tions in the Hindu Kush, Johannes Kal­ter et al.”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXIV/2 (sum­mer 1999), pp. 72–75.

26) (art­icle) “Art of Tibet, Robert E. Fish­er”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXV/1 (spring 2000), pp. 74–89.

27) (review art­icle) “Hugh Richard­son — Dav­id Snellgrove, Tibet. Stor­ia della trad­iz­ione, della let­ter­atura e dell’arte”, pub­lished with vari­ants in Annali dell’Isti­tuto Uni­versit­ario Ori­entale, 58/3–4 (1998), pp. 583–86, Riv­ista degli Studi Ori­ent­ali, LXXIII/1–4 (2000), pp. 335–39, and in G. R. Franci (ed.), Studi ori­ent­ali e lin­guist­ici, VII, Bologna, Alma Mater Stu­dior­um, 2000, pp. 564–69, Asi­at­ica Vene­tiana, 10–11 (2009), pp. 175–78, and Quaderni Asi­atici, 93 (March 2011), pp. 116–22.

28) “Giuseppe Tucci, Tibetan Painted Scrolls”, East and West, 50/1–4 (2000), pp. 597–603 and The Tibet Journ­al, XXVII/3–4 (autumn-winter 2002), pp. 183–90 (updated version).

29) (art­icle) “Ima­ging Wis­dom. See­ing and Know­ing in the Art of Indi­an Buddhism, by Jac­ob N. Kinnard, The Tibet Journ­al, XXVI/2 (2001), pp. 68–77.

30) (art­icle) “In the Image of Tibet. Paint­ing after 1959, by Clare Har­ris”, in E. Lo Bue (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVI/3–4 (autum­n­winter 2001), pp. 206–24.

31) “Ajanta. Hand­book of the Paint­ings, by Dieter Schlin­gloff”, in E. Lo Bue (ed.), Con­tri­bu­tions to the His­tory of Tibetan Art, spe­cial issue of The Tibet Journ­al, XXVII/1–2 (spring-sum­mer 2002), pp. 256–57.

32) “Chris­ti­an Luczan­its, Buddhist Sculp­ture in Clay. Early West­ern Him­alay­an Art, Late 10 th to Early 13 th Cen­tur­ies”, East and West, 55/1–4 (Decem­ber 2005), pp. 497–99.

33) “Per K. Sørensen and Gun­tram Hazod, Thun­der­ing Fal­con. An Inquiry into the His­tory and Cult of Khra-’brug Tibet’s First Buddhist Temple”, East and West, 56/4 (Decem­ber 2006), pp. 476–78.

34) “Arms and Armor of Tibet, by Don­ald J. LaRocca with essays by John Clarke, Amy Heller, and Loz­ang Jam­spal”, Marg, 58/3 (March 2007), pp. 66–69.

35) “The Temples of Lhasa: Tibetan Buddhist Archi­tec­ture from the 7th to the 21st Cen­tur­ies, by André Alex­an­der”, Ori­ent­a­tions, 38/4 (May 2007), pp. 99–101.

36) “Enzo Gual­tiero Bar­gi­ac­chi, Ippolito Desid­eri S. J. Opere e bib­li­o­grafia, Insti­tu­tum Historicum

S. I. Roma 2007”, The Tibet Journ­al, XXXII/1 (spring 2007), pp. 98–99.

37) “Per K. Sørensen and Gun­tram Hazod (in cooper­a­tion with Tser­ing Gyalbo), Rulers on the Celes­ti­al Plain. Eccle­si­ast­ic­al and Sec­u­lar Hege­mony in Medi­ev­al Tibet. A Study of Tshal Gun­gthang”, East and West, 58/1–4 (Decem­ber 2008), pp. 480–81.

38) “Tradurre o tra­dire? Hugh Richard­son – Dav­id Snellgrove, Tibet. Stor­ia della trad­iz­ione della let­ter­atura e dell’arte”, Asi­at­ica Vene­tiana, 10/11 (2009), pp. 175–78.

39) “Dav­id Jack­son, Steven Kos­sak, Painted Images of Enlight­en­ment. Early Tibetan Thankas, 1050–1450, with a fore­word by Pra­tapaditya Pal”, The Tibet Journ­al, XLI/1 (spring/summer 2016), pp. 147–53. Errata, The Tibet Journ­al, XLI/2 (autumn-winter 2016), p. 128.

40) “Dav­id Jack­son, The Place of Proven­ance. Region­al Styles in Tibetan Paint­ing, with a con­tri­bu­tion by Rob Lin­rothe, New York, Rubin Museum of Art (Mas­ter­works of Tibetan paint­ing series, 4), 2012. xix + 235 pages, most illus­tra­tions in col­our, 5 maps, bib­li­o­graphy, index, Arts Asi­atiques, 74 (2019), pp. 183–184.

 

Translations

Rosa M. Cim­ino, Life at Court in Rajasthan, Firen­ze, 1985, xlvi-121 pp.